Dawdle vs Meander - What's the difference?

dawdle | meander |


In lang=en terms the difference between dawdle and meander

is that dawdle is to move or walk lackadaisically while meander is to wind, turn, or twist; to make flexuous.

As verbs the difference between dawdle and meander

is that dawdle is to spend time idly and unfruitfully, to waste time while meander is to wind or turn in a course or passage; to be intricate.

As nouns the difference between dawdle and meander

is that dawdle is a dawdler while meander is a winding, crooked, or involved course.

dawdle

English

Verb

(dawdl)
  • To spend time idly and unfruitfully, to waste time.
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=October 29 , author=Neil Johnston , title=Norwich 3 - 3 Blackburn , work=BBC Sport citation , page= , passage=However all Hennessey's good work went to waste on 52 minutes when he dawdled on the ball.}}
  • * Johnson
  • Come some evening and dawdle over a dish of tea with me.
  • To spend (time) without haste or purpose.
  • to dawdle away the whole morning
  • To move or walk lackadaisically.
  • If you dawdle on your daily walk, you won't get as much exercise.
  • * Thackeray
  • We dawdle up and down Pall Mall.

    See also

    * dally, dander, dandle, diddle, loaf, piddle, wander, doodle

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A dawdler.
  • meander

    English

    Alternative forms

    * (archaic)

    Noun

    (wikipedia meander) (en noun)
  • A winding, crooked, or involved course.
  • the meanders of an old river, or of the veins and arteries in the body
  • * Sir R. Blackmore
  • While lingering rivers in meanders glide.
  • A tortuous or intricate movement.
  • Fretwork.
  • (math) A self-avoiding closed curve which intersects a line a number of times.
  • Derived terms

    * meander belt * meanderer * meandering * meanderian * meanderic * meanderiform * meanderine * meander line * meander loop * meandrous * meandry

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To wind or turn in a course or passage; to be intricate.
  • The stream meandered through the valley.
  • To wind, turn, or twist; to make flexuous.
  • (Dryton)

    References

    * The Chambers Dictionary (1998)

    Anagrams

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