Mate vs Amate - What's the difference?

mate | amate |


As nouns the difference between mate and amate

is that mate is a fellow, comrade, colleague, partner or someone with whom something is shared, eg shipmate, classmate or mate can be (chess) short for checkmate or mate can be ) while amate is paper produced from the bark of adult ficus trees.

As verbs the difference between mate and amate

is that mate is to match, fit together without space between or mate can be to win a game of chess by putting the opponent in checkmate while amate is (label) to dishearten, dismay or amate can be (obsolete) to be a mate to; to match.

mate

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl), from (etyl) ). More at (l), (l).

Noun

(en noun)
  • A fellow, comrade, colleague, partner or someone with whom something is shared, e.g. shipmate, classmate.
  • (especially of a non-human animal) A breeding partner.
  • (colloquial, British, Australia, New Zealand) A friend, usually of the same sex.
  • I'm going to the pub with a few mates .
    He's my best mate .
  • (colloquial, British, Australia, New Zealand) a colloquial "sir"; an informal and friendly term of address to a stranger, usually male
  • Excuse me, mate , have you got the time?
  • (nautical) In naval ranks, a non-commissioned officer or his subordinate (e.g. (w, Boatswain's Mate), (w, Gunner's Mate), Sailmaker's Mate, etc).
  • (nautical) A ship's officer, subordinate to the master on a commercial ship.
  • (nautical) A first mate.
  • A technical assistant in certain trades (e.g. gasfitter's mate'', ''plumber's mate ); sometimes an apprentice.
  • The other member of a matched pair of objects.
  • ''I found one of the socks I wanted to wear, but I couldn't find its mate .
  • A suitable companion; a match; an equal.
  • * Milton
  • Ye knew me once no mate / For you; there sitting where you durst not soar.
    Synonyms
    (checksyns) * fellow * friend * buddy * sir * partner * See also
    Derived terms
    (Derived terms) * bedmate * bunkmate * cellmate * classmate * crewmate * flatmate * floormate * housemate * mateship * office mate * roommate * shipmate * teammate * tourmate * workmate

    Verb

  • To match, fit together without space between.
  • The pieces of the puzzle mate perfectly.
  • To copulate.
  • To pair in order to raise offspring
  • To arrange in matched pairs.
  • To introduce (animals) together for the purpose of breeding.
  • To marry; to match (a person).
  • * Shakespeare
  • If she be mated with an equal husband.
  • To match oneself against; to oppose as equal; to compete with.
  • * Francis Bacon
  • There is no passion in the mind of man so weak but it mates and masters the fear of death.
  • * Shakespeare
  • I, / Dare mate a sounder man than Surrey can be.
  • To fit (objects) together without space between.
  • (aerospace) To move (a space shuttle orbiter) onto the back of an aircraft that can carry it.
  • Synonyms
    (checksyns) * couple * match * pair
    Antonyms
    * (aerospace) demate
    Derived terms
    * mating

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) verb maten, (etyl) mater, from (etyl) noun .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (chess) Short for checkmate.
  • Verb

  • To win a game of chess by putting the opponent in checkmate
  • To confuse; to confound.
  • (Shakespeare)

    Etymology 3

    See

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • ).
  • The abovementioned plant; the leaves and shoots used for the tea
  • Anagrams

    * * * * ----

    amate

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) papel .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Paper produced from the bark of adult Ficus trees.
  • An art form based on Mexican bark painting from the Otomi culture.
  • Etymology 2

    From (etyl) amater, amatir.

    Verb

    (amat)
  • (label) To dishearten, dismay.
  • * (John Milton) (1608-1674)
  • The Silures, to amate the new general, rumoured the overthrow greater than was true.
  • * , I.i:
  • Shall I accuse the hidden cruell fate, / And mightie causes wrought in heauen aboue, / Or the blind God, that doth me thus amate , / For hoped loue to winne me certaine hate?
  • * 1600 , (Edward Fairfax), The (Jerusalem Delivered) of (w), XI, xii:
  • Upon the walls the pagans old and young / Stood hush'd and still, amated and amazed.
  • * , Folio Society, 2006, vol.1, p.230:
  • For the last, he will be much amazed, he will be much amated .
  • * c.1815 , (John Keats), "To Chatterton":
  • Thou didst die / A half-blown flow'ret which cold blasts amate .

    Etymology 3

    .

    Verb

    (amat)
  • (obsolete) To be a mate to; to match.
  • (Spenser)

    Anagrams

    * ----