Confection vs Marmalade - What's the difference?

confection | marmalade | Related terms |

Confection is a related term of marmalade.


As nouns the difference between confection and marmalade

is that confection is a food item prepared very sweet, frequently decorated in fine detail, and often preserved with sugar, such as a candy, sweetmeat, fruit preserve, pastry, or cake while marmalade is citrus fruit variant of jam but distinguished by being made slightly bitter by the addition of the peel and by partial caramelisation during manufacture most commonly made with seville oranges, and usually qualified by the name of the fruit when made with other types of fruit.

As verbs the difference between confection and marmalade

is that confection is to make into a confection, prepare as a confection while marmalade is to spread marmalade on.

confection

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • A food item prepared very sweet, frequently decorated in fine detail, and often preserved with sugar, such as a candy, sweetmeat, fruit preserve, pastry, or cake.
  • The table was covered with all sorts of tempting confections .
  • The act or process of confecting; the process of making]], compounding, or [[prepare, preparing something.
  • The result of such a process; something made up or confected; a concoction.
  • The defense attorney maintained that the charges were a confection of the local police.
  • (dated) An artistic, musical, or literary work taken as frivolous, amusing, or contrived; a composition of a light nature.
  • (dated) Something, such as a garment or a decoration, seen as very elaborate, delicate, or luxurious, usually also seen as impractical or non-utilitarian.
  • * 2007 , , Primal Desires
  • She found a sexy, lacy confection in a lingerie drawer and quickly slipped into it.
  • (pharmacology) A preparation of medicine sweetened with sugar, honey, syrup, or the like; an electuary.
  • Verb

    (en verb)
  • To make into a confection, prepare as a confection.
  • ----

    marmalade

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Citrus fruit variant of jam but distinguished by being made slightly bitter by the addition of the peel and by partial caramelisation during manufacture. Most commonly made with Seville oranges, and usually qualified by the name of the fruit when made with other types of fruit.
  • lime marmalade
    thick cut marmalade

    Derived terms

    * marmaladey * marmalady

    Verb

    (marmalad)
  • To spread marmalade on.
  • Derived terms

    * marmalader * marmalading