Matchest vs Marchest - What's the difference?

matchest | marchest |


In archaic|lang=en terms the difference between matchest and marchest

is that matchest is (archaic) (match) while marchest is (archaic) (march).

As verbs the difference between matchest and marchest

is that matchest is (archaic) (match) while marchest is (archaic) (march).

matchest

English

Verb

(head)
  • (archaic) (match)

  • match

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) macche, from (etyl)

    Noun

    (es)
  • (sports) A competitive sporting event such as a boxing meet, a baseball game, or a cricket match.
  • My local team are playing in a match against their arch-rivals today.
  • Any contest or trial of strength or skill, or to determine superiority.
  • * Drayton
  • many a warlike match
  • * Dryden
  • A solemn match was made; he lost the prize.
  • Someone with a measure of an attribute equaling or exceeding the object of comparison.
  • He knew he had met his match .
  • * Addison
  • Government makes an innocent man, though of the lowest rank, a match for the mightiest of his fellow subjects.
  • A marriage.
  • A candidate for matrimony; one to be gained in marriage.
  • * Clarendon
  • She was looked upon as the richest match of the West.
  • Suitability.
  • Equivalence; a state of correspondence. (rfex)
  • Equality of conditions in contest or competition.
  • * Shakespeare
  • It were no match , your nail against his horn.
  • A pair of items or entities with mutually suitable characteristics.
  • The carpet and curtains are a match .
  • An agreement or compact.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Thy hand upon that match .
  • * Boyle
  • Love doth seldom suffer itself to be confined by other matches than those of its own making.
  • (metalworking) A perforated board, block of plaster, hardened sand, etc., in which a pattern is partly embedded when a mould is made, for giving shape to the surfaces of separation between the parts of the mould.
  • Derived terms
    * cage match * first class match * friendly match * grudge match * * love match * Man of the Match/man of the match * match fixing * match made in heaven * match made in hell * matchless * matchmaker * match play/matchplay * matchplayer * match point * match referee * * one-day match * overmatch * post-match * rubber match * shouting match * slanging match * steel cage match * Test match * tour match * whole shitting match * whole shooting match

    Verb

    (es)
  • (lb) To agree, to be equal, to correspond to.
  • :
  • :
  • (lb) To agree, to be equal, to correspond to.
  • :
  • *
  • *:There was a neat hat-and-umbrella stand, and the stranger's weary feet fell soft on a good, serviceable dark-red drugget, which matched in colour the flock-paper on the walls.
  • *{{quote-book, year=1927, author= F. E. Penny
  • , chapter=4, title= Pulling the Strings , passage=Soon after the arrival of Mrs. Campbell, dinner was announced by Abboye. He came into the drawing room resplendent in his gold-and-white turban. […] His cummerbund matched the turban in gold lines.}}
  • (lb) To make a successful match or pairing.
  • :
  • *{{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-01, volume=407, issue=8838, page=71, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= End of the peer show , passage=Finance is seldom romantic. But the idea of peer-to-peer lending comes close. This is an industry that brings together individual savers and lenders on online platforms. Those that want to borrow are matched with those that want to lend.}}
  • (lb) To equal or exceed in achievement.
  • :
  • (lb) To unite in marriage, to mate.
  • *1599 , (William Shakespeare), (Much Ado About Nothing) , :
  • *:Adam's sons are my brethren; and truly, I hold it a sin to match in my kindred.
  • *(Joseph Addison) (1672-1719)
  • *:A senator of Rome survived, / Would not have matched his daughter with a king.
  • To fit together, or make suitable for fitting together; specifically, to furnish with a tongue and groove at the edges.
  • :
  • Derived terms
    * match drill * matcher * matchup * matchy * * overmatch * unmatch
    See also
    * mate

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl)

    Noun

    (es)
  • Device made of wood or paper, at the tip coated with chemicals that ignite with the friction of being dragged (struck) against a rough dry surface.
  • He struck a match and lit his cigarette.
    Synonyms
    * spunk
    Derived terms
    * fireplace match * matchbook, matchbox, matchlock * matchgirl * phosphorus match * quick match * safety match * slow match * strike-anywhere match * sulfur match * sulphur match
    See also
    * fire, lighter, cigarette lighter * strike (to strike a match)

    marchest

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (archaic) (march)

  • march

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) (m), from (etyl) . Akin to (etyl) mearc'', ''?emearc "mark, boundary".

    Noun

    (es)
  • A formal, rhythmic way of walking, used especially by soldiers, bands and in ceremonies.
  • A political rally or parade
  • Any song in the genre of music written for marching (see )
  • Steady forward movement or progression.
  • the march of time
  • (euchre) The feat of taking all the tricks of a hand.
  • Synonyms
    * (steady forward movement or progression) process * (political rally) protest, parade, rally * (steady forward movement) advancement, progression
    Derived terms
    * countermarch * dead march * death march * double march * force-march * forced march * freedom march * frog-march, frog march, frog's march * funeral march * gain a march on, get a march on * grand march * hour of march * in a full march * in march * Jacksonian march * Jarvis march * line of march * make a march * march haemoglobinuria, march hemoglobinuria * march-on * march-order * march out * march-past * march-time * march tumor, march tumour * march to a different drummer * march to the beat of a different drum * minute of march * on a march * on the march * outmarch * rogue's march * route march, route-march, routemarch * slow march * snowball marches * steal a march * wedding march

    Verb

    (es)
  • To walk with long, regular strides, as a soldier does.
  • To cause someone to walk somewhere.
  • * {{quote-book
  • , year = 1967 , first = Barbara , last = Sleigh , authorlink = Barbara Sleigh , title = (Jessamy) , edition = 1993 , location = Sevenoaks, Kent , publisher=Bloomsbury , isbn = 0 340 19547 9 , page = 84 , url = , passage = The old man heaved himself from the chair, seized Jessamy by her pinafore frill and marched her to the house. }}
  • To go to war; to make military advances.
  • Derived terms
    * dismarch * marcher * marching * march off * march on * march to the beat of a different drum * outmarch * overmarch * remarch

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) .

    Noun

    (es)
  • A border region, especially one originally set up to defend a boundary.
  • * , Book V:
  • Therefore, sir, be my counsayle, rere up your lyege peple and sende kynges and dewkes to loke unto your marchis , and that the mountaynes of Almayne be myghtyly kepte.
  • (label) A region at a frontier governed by a marquess.
  • The name for any of various territories with similar meanings or etymologies in their native languages.
  • * 1819 , (Lord Byron), , IV:
  • Juan's companion was a Romagnole, / But bred within the March of old Ancona.
    Synonyms
    * (border region) frontier, marchland * (territory) county palatinate, county palatine
    Derived terms
    * Lord Warden of the Marches * marcher * march-gat * march-land * march-man * march parts, march-party * * march stone * march-ward *

    Verb

  • To have common borders or frontiers
  • Etymology 3

    Noun

    (es)
  • (obsolete) Smallage.
  • Synonyms
    * (l)