Contest vs March - What's the difference?

contest | march |


As a noun contest

is (uncountable) controversy; debate.

As a verb contest

is to contend.

As a proper noun march is

the third month of the gregorian calendar, following february and preceding april abbreviation: mar' or ' .

contest

English

Noun

  • (uncountable) Controversy; debate.
  • no contest
  • (uncountable) Struggle for superiority; combat.
  • (countable) A competition.
  • The child entered the spelling contest .

    Synonyms

    * (controversy) controversy, debate, discussion * (combat) battle, combat, fight * (competition) competition, pageant

    Derived terms

    (Terms derived from the noun "contest") * contest shape * fashion contest * no contest * pissing contest * popularity contest * wet t-shirt contest * will contest

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To contend.
  • I will contest for the open seat on the board.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • Of man, who dares in pomp with Jove contest ?
  • * Bishop Burnet
  • The difficulty of an argument adds to the pleasure of contesting with it, when there are hopes of victory.
  • To call into question; to oppose.
  • The rival contested the dictator's re-election because of claims of voting irregularities.
  • * J. D. Morell
  • Few philosophical aphorisms have been more frequently repeated, few more contested than this.
  • To strive earnestly to hold or maintain; to struggle to defend.
  • The troops contested every inch of ground.
  • (legal) To make a subject of litigation; to defend, as a suit; to dispute or resist, as a claim, by course of law; to controvert.
  • Synonyms

    * (contend) compete, contend, go in for * (oppose) call into question, oppose

    Antonyms

    * (oppose) support

    march

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) (m), from (etyl) . Akin to (etyl) mearc'', ''?emearc "mark, boundary".

    Noun

    (es)
  • A formal, rhythmic way of walking, used especially by soldiers, bands and in ceremonies.
  • A political rally or parade
  • Any song in the genre of music written for marching (see )
  • Steady forward movement or progression.
  • the march of time
  • (euchre) The feat of taking all the tricks of a hand.
  • Synonyms
    * (steady forward movement or progression) process * (political rally) protest, parade, rally * (steady forward movement) advancement, progression
    Derived terms
    * countermarch * dead march * death march * double march * force-march * forced march * freedom march * frog-march, frog march, frog's march * funeral march * gain a march on, get a march on * grand march * hour of march * in a full march * in march * Jacksonian march * Jarvis march * line of march * make a march * march haemoglobinuria, march hemoglobinuria * march-on * march-order * march out * march-past * march-time * march tumor, march tumour * march to a different drummer * march to the beat of a different drum * minute of march * on a march * on the march * outmarch * rogue's march * route march, route-march, routemarch * slow march * snowball marches * steal a march * wedding march

    Verb

    (es)
  • To walk with long, regular strides, as a soldier does.
  • To cause someone to walk somewhere.
  • * {{quote-book
  • , year = 1967 , first = Barbara , last = Sleigh , authorlink = Barbara Sleigh , title = (Jessamy) , edition = 1993 , location = Sevenoaks, Kent , publisher=Bloomsbury , isbn = 0 340 19547 9 , page = 84 , url = , passage = The old man heaved himself from the chair, seized Jessamy by her pinafore frill and marched her to the house. }}
  • To go to war; to make military advances.
  • Derived terms
    * dismarch * marcher * marching * march off * march on * march to the beat of a different drum * outmarch * overmarch * remarch

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) .

    Noun

    (es)
  • A border region, especially one originally set up to defend a boundary.
  • * , Book V:
  • Therefore, sir, be my counsayle, rere up your lyege peple and sende kynges and dewkes to loke unto your marchis , and that the mountaynes of Almayne be myghtyly kepte.
  • (label) A region at a frontier governed by a marquess.
  • The name for any of various territories with similar meanings or etymologies in their native languages.
  • * 1819 , (Lord Byron), , IV:
  • Juan's companion was a Romagnole, / But bred within the March of old Ancona.
    Synonyms
    * (border region) frontier, marchland * (territory) county palatinate, county palatine
    Derived terms
    * Lord Warden of the Marches * marcher * march-gat * march-land * march-man * march parts, march-party * * march stone * march-ward *

    Verb

  • To have common borders or frontiers
  • Etymology 3

    Noun

    (es)
  • (obsolete) Smallage.
  • Synonyms
    * (l)