Fulminate vs Maraud - What's the difference?

fulminate | maraud |


As a noun fulminate

is .

As a verb maraud is

to move about in roving fashion looking for plunder.

fulminate

Verb

  • (figuratively) To make a verbal attack.
  • (figuratively) To issue as a denunciation.
  • * De Quincey
  • They fulminated the most hostile of all decrees.
  • To strike with lightning; to cause to explode.
  • * 2009 , Thomas Pynchon, Inherent Vice , Vintage 2010, p. 235:
  • the present owners couldn't afford the electric bills anymore, several amateur gaffers, sad to say, having already been fulminated trying to bootleg power in off the municipal lines.

    Synonyms

    * (verbal attack) berate, condemn, criticize, denounce, denunciate, vilify

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (chemistry) Any salt or ester of fulminic acid, mostly explosive.
  • * 1977 , (Alistair Horne), A Savage War of Peace , New York Review Books 2006, p. 193:
  • On 19 February a jubilant Bigeard announced that his 3rd R.P.C. had seized eighty-seven bombs, seventy kilos of explosive, 5,120 fulminate of mercury detonators, 309 electric detonators, etc.

    maraud

    English

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To move about in roving fashion looking for plunder.
  • a marauding band
  • * {{quote-book
  • , year= 1684 , year_published= 1728 , author= (Thomas Otway) , by= , title= The Works of Mr. Thomas Otway , url= http://books.google.com/books?id=tA4UAAAAQAAJ&pg=PA88 , original= , chapter= , section= The Atheist; or the Second Part of the Soldier's Fortune , isbn= , edition= , publisher= Richard, James, and Bethel Wellington , location= London , editor= , volume= 2 , page= 88 , passage= Peace Plunder , Peace, you Rogue; no Moroding now i we'll burn, rob, demolish and murder another time together : This is a Bus'ness must be done with decency. }}
  • * {{quote-book
  • , year= 1711 , year_published= 1721 , author= (Joseph Addison) , by= , title= The Spectator, no. 90-505 , url= http://books.google.com/books?id=jAszAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA115 , original= , chapter= , section= , isbn= , edition= , publisher= Thomas Tickell , location= London , editor= , volume= 3 , page= 115 , passage= in one of which they met with a party of French that had been marauding , and made them all prisoners at discretion. }}
  • To go about aggressively or in a predatory manner.
  • * {{quote-book
  • , year= 1770 , year_published= , author= , by= , title= The Critical Review: Or, Annals of Literature , url= http://books.google.com/books?id=4FrQAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA73 , original= , chapter= Fables for Grown Gentlemen , section= , isbn= , edition= , publisher= A. Hamilton , location= London , editor= Tobias George Smollett , volume= 29 , page= 73 , passage= A flea out of a blanket shaken, A bloody-minded sinner, Upon a taylor's neck was taken, Marauding for a dinner. }}
  • To raid and pillage.
  • * {{quote-book
  • , year= 1829 , year_published= , author= (Washington Irving) , by= , title= A Chronicle of the Conquest of Granada: In Two Volumes , url= http://books.google.com/books?id=hylOAAAAcAAJ&pg=PA118 , original= , chapter= , section= , isbn= , edition= , publisher= Baudry, at the Foreign Library , location= Paris , editor= , volume= 1 , page= 118-9 , passage= As the tract of country they intended to maraud was far in the Moorish territories near the coast of the Mediterranean, they did not arrive until late in the following day. }}

    Usage notes

    The verb and adjective are more common as “marauding”.

    See also

    * (l)

    Anagrams

    * (l)