Fleece vs Maraud - What's the difference?

fleece | maraud | Related terms |

Fleece is a related term of maraud.


As verbs the difference between fleece and maraud

is that fleece is to con or trick someone out of money while maraud is to move about in roving fashion looking for plunder.

As a noun fleece

is (uncountable) hair or wool of a sheep or similar animal.

fleece

English

(wikipedia fleece)

Noun

  • (uncountable) Hair or wool of a sheep or similar animal
  • (uncountable) Insulating skin with the wool attached
  • (countable) A textile similar to velvet, but with a longer pile that gives it a softness and a higher sheen.
  • (countable) An insulating wooly jacket
  • (roofing) Mat or felts composed of fibers, sometimes used as a membrane backer.
  • Any soft woolly covering resembling a fleece.
  • The fine web of cotton or wool removed by the doffing knife from the cylinder of a carding machine.
  • Verb

    (fleec)
  • to con or trick someone out of money
  • to shear the fleece from an animal (such as a sheep)
  • See also

    * (con) nickel and dime

    maraud

    English

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To move about in roving fashion looking for plunder.
  • a marauding band
  • * {{quote-book
  • , year= 1684 , year_published= 1728 , author= (Thomas Otway) , by= , title= The Works of Mr. Thomas Otway , url= http://books.google.com/books?id=tA4UAAAAQAAJ&pg=PA88 , original= , chapter= , section= The Atheist; or the Second Part of the Soldier's Fortune , isbn= , edition= , publisher= Richard, James, and Bethel Wellington , location= London , editor= , volume= 2 , page= 88 , passage= Peace Plunder , Peace, you Rogue; no Moroding now i we'll burn, rob, demolish and murder another time together : This is a Bus'ness must be done with decency. }}
  • * {{quote-book
  • , year= 1711 , year_published= 1721 , author= (Joseph Addison) , by= , title= The Spectator, no. 90-505 , url= http://books.google.com/books?id=jAszAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA115 , original= , chapter= , section= , isbn= , edition= , publisher= Thomas Tickell , location= London , editor= , volume= 3 , page= 115 , passage= in one of which they met with a party of French that had been marauding , and made them all prisoners at discretion. }}
  • To go about aggressively or in a predatory manner.
  • * {{quote-book
  • , year= 1770 , year_published= , author= , by= , title= The Critical Review: Or, Annals of Literature , url= http://books.google.com/books?id=4FrQAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA73 , original= , chapter= Fables for Grown Gentlemen , section= , isbn= , edition= , publisher= A. Hamilton , location= London , editor= Tobias George Smollett , volume= 29 , page= 73 , passage= A flea out of a blanket shaken, A bloody-minded sinner, Upon a taylor's neck was taken, Marauding for a dinner. }}
  • To raid and pillage.
  • * {{quote-book
  • , year= 1829 , year_published= , author= (Washington Irving) , by= , title= A Chronicle of the Conquest of Granada: In Two Volumes , url= http://books.google.com/books?id=hylOAAAAcAAJ&pg=PA118 , original= , chapter= , section= , isbn= , edition= , publisher= Baudry, at the Foreign Library , location= Paris , editor= , volume= 1 , page= 118-9 , passage= As the tract of country they intended to maraud was far in the Moorish territories near the coast of the Mediterranean, they did not arrive until late in the following day. }}

    Usage notes

    The verb and adjective are more common as “marauding”.

    See also

    * (l)

    Anagrams

    * (l)