Manured vs Manred - What's the difference?

manured | manred |


As a verb manured

is (manure).

As a noun manred is

homage or manred can be (mythology) primal substance of the universe.

manured

English

Verb

(head)
  • (manure)
  • Anagrams

    * * * *

    manure

    English

    Verb

    (manur)
  • To cultivate by manual labor; to till; hence, to develop by culture.
  • * Surrey
  • to whom we gave the strand for to manure
  • * John Donne
  • Manure thyself then; to thyself be improved; / And with vain, outward things be no more moved.
  • To apply manure (as fertilizer or soil improver).
  • The farmer manured his fallow field.
  • * Shakespeare
  • The blood of English shall manure the ground.

    Derived terms

    * manurable

    See also

    * to fertilize

    Noun

  • Animal excrement, especially that of common domestic farm animals and when used as fertilizer. Generally speaking, from cows, horses, sheep, pigs and chickens.
  • * '>citation
  • Any fertilizing substance, whether of animal origin or not.
  • * Sir Humphry Davy
  • Malt dust consists chiefly of the infant radicle separated from the grain. I have never made any experiment upon this manure ; but there is great reason to suppose it must contain saccharine matter; and this will account for its powerful effects.

    Derived terms

    * humanure

    See also

    * fertilizer * muck

    manred

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) manred, manrede, from (etyl) .

    Alternative forms

    * (l), (l) * (l), (l), (l) (Scotland)

    Noun

    (-)
  • Homage.
  • Vassals collectively; the supply of men a lord can call upon in time of warfare.
  • :* {{quote-book
  • , year=2009 , year_published= , edition= , editor= , author=Eric William Ives , title=Lady Jane Grey: A Tudor Mystery , chapter=The March on Framlingham citation , genre= , publisher=John Wiley and Sons , isbn=9781405194136 , page=203 , passage=There he was joined by his sons and addition troops, almost certainly more of the Dudley manred from the Midlands. }}
  • The position of leader among fighting men; the conduct (of an army).
  • Carnal intercourse.
  • The solemn undertaking to be one's faithful supporter, and the obligation so constituted.
  • Etymology 2

    Noun

    (-)
  • (mythology) primal substance of the Universe
  • :* {{quote-book
  • , year=2003 , year_published= , edition= , editor=G. De Purucker , author=Kennth Morris , title=Theosophical Path Magazine, January to June 1930 , chapter=Druidism citation , genre= , publisher=Kessinger Publishing , isbn=9780766180734 , page=131 , passage=They were made of the manred''''', that is, of the elements in the extremities of their particles and smallest atom … God was in each of the particles of the '''''manred , ... }}
  • :* {{quote-book
  • , year=2004 , year_published= , edition= , editor= , author=Lewis Spence , title=An Introduction to Mythology , chapter=The Celtic Idea of the Origin of Man citation , genre= , publisher=Cosimo, Inc , isbn=9781596050563 , page=169 , passage=God pronounce his ineffable name, and Manred', the primal substance of the Universe, was formed. ' Manred was composed of thousands of teeming atoms in each of which God was present, and each was part of God. }}