Car vs Mango - What's the difference?

car | mango |


As nouns the difference between car and mango

is that car is friend while mango is mango.

As a verb car

is (lb).

car

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) (m), from (etyl) (m) (from .

Noun

(en noun)
  • (dated) A wheeled vehicle, drawn by a horse or other animal.
  • A wheeled vehicle that moves independently, with at least three wheels, powered mechanically, steered by a driver and mostly for personal transportation; a motorcar or automobile.
  • She drove her car to the mall.
  • * {{quote-book, year=2006, author=
  • , title=Internal Combustion , chapter=1 citation , passage=If successful, Edison and Ford—in 1914—would move society away from the ever more expensive and then universally known killing hazards of gasoline cars : […] .}}
  • (rail transport, chiefly, North America) An unpowered unit in a railroad train.
  • The conductor coupled the cars to the locomotive.
  • (rail transport) an individual vehicle, powered or unpowered, in a multiple unit.
  • The 11:10 to London was operated by a 4-car diesel multiple unit
  • (rail transport) A passenger-carrying unit in a subway or elevated train, whether powered or not.
  • From the front-most car of the subway, he filmed the progress through the tunnel.
  • A rough unit of quantity approximating the amount which would fill a railroad car.
  • We ordered five hundred cars of gypsum.
  • The moving, load-carrying component of an elevator or other cable-drawn transport mechanism.
  • Fix the car of the express elevator - the door is sticking.
  • The passenger-carrying portion of certain amusement park rides, such as Ferris wheels.
  • The most exciting part of riding a Ferris wheel is when your car goes over the top.
  • The part of an airship, such as a balloon or dirigible, which houses the passengers and control apparatus.
  • * {{quote-book, 1850, , 3= A System of Aeronautics, page=152
  • , passage=Everything being apparently in readiness now, I stepped into the car of the balloon,
  • (sailing) A sliding fitting that runs along a track.
  • * {{quote-book, 1995, Ken Textor, The New Book of Sail Trim, page=201 citation
  • , passage=On boats 25 feet or more, it is best to mount a mast car and track on the front of the mast so you can adjust the height of the pole above the deck }}
  • (uncountable, US) The aggregate of desirable characteristics of a car.
  • Buy now! You can get more car for your money.
  • (US) A floating perforated box for living fish.
  • Image:TOYOTA FCHV 01.jpg, A hydrogen-powered car . Image:Train wagons 0834.jpg, Freight cars . Image:RandenTrain.jpg, A self-propelled passenger car . Image:Ferris wheel - melbourne show 2005.jpg, Ferris wheel cars . Image:Traveller (sailing).jpg, Car on a sailboat. Image:ZeppelinLZ127b.jpg, Car of a Zeppelin. Image:240 Sparks Elevators.jpg, Elevator cars .
    Synonyms
    * (private vehicle that moves independently) auto, motorcar, vehicle; automobile (US), motor (British colloquial), carriage (obsolete) * (non-powered part of a train) railcar, wagon * (unit of quantity) carload, wagonload * (passenger-carrying light rail unit) carriage * (part of an airship) gondola, basket (balloons only) * See also
    Derived terms
    * * * * * , (l) * (l) * * * * * * , (l) * * (l) * * *

    See also

    * bus * truck * van

    Etymology 2

    Acronym of c'''ontents]] of the '''a'''ddress part of [[register, '''r egister number . Note that it was based on original hardware and has no meaning today.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (computing) The first part of a cons in LISP. The first element of a list
  • * Matt Kaufmann, Panagiotis Manolios, and J Strother Moore, Computer-aided reasoning: an approach , 2000 :
  • The elements of a list are the successive cars''' along the "cdr chain." That is, the elements are the '''car''', the '''car''' of the cdr, the '''car of the cdr of the cdr, etc.
    Antonyms
    *
    Derived terms
    * *

    Anagrams

    * * * 1000 English basic words ----

    mango

    English

    (wikipedia mango) (Mangifera indica) (Cucumis melo) (Anthracothorax)

    Noun

    (en-noun)
  • (botany) A tropical Asian fruit tree, .
  • The fruit of the mango tree.
  • * 1738 , October–November, (Hans Sloan), Philosophical Transactions , volume 40, number 450, “VI. his Answer to the Marquis de Caumont's Letter, concerning this Stone”, translated from the Latin by (Thomas Stack), (Royal Society) (1741), page 376:
  • And I have one [bezoar] form'd round the Stone of that great Plum, which comes pickled from thence, and is called Mango .
  • A pickled vegetable or fruit with a spicy stuffing; a vegetable or fruit which has been .
  • * 2004 , Elizabeth E. Lea, William Woys Weaver, A Quaker Woman's Cookbook: The Domestic Cookery of Elizabeth Ellicott Lea , page 335
  • In Pennsylvania and western Maryland, mangoes were generally made with green bell peppers.
  • A green bell pepper suitable for pickling.
  • * 1879 , Pennsylvania State Board of Agriculture, Agriculture of Pennsylvania , Page 222
  • Mango peppers by the dozen, if owned by the careful housewife, would gladden the appetite or disposition of any epicure or scold.
  • * 1896 , Ohio State Board of Agriculture, Annual Report , Page 154
  • Best mango peppers
  • * {{quote-news, 1943, August 9, Mary Adgate, Stuffed Mangoes, The Lima News, city=Lima, Ohio, page=5 citation
  • , passage=Cut tops from mangoes ; remove seeds.}}
  • * 2000 , Allan A. Metcalf, How We Talk: American Regional English Today , page 41
  • Finally, although both the South and North Midlands are not known for their tropical climate, that's where mangoes grow. These aren't the tropical fruit, though, but what are elsewhere called green peppers.
  • A type of muskmelon, Cucumis melo .
  • Any of various hummingbirds of the genus Anthracothorax .
  • (colour) A yellow-orange color, like that of mango flesh.
  • Verb

    (es)
  • (uncommon) To stuff and pickle (a fruit).
  • * 1870 , Hannah Mary Peterson, The Young Wife's Cook Book , page 444:
  • Although any melon may be used before it is quite ripe, yet there is a particular sort for this purpose, which the gardeners know, and should be mangoed soon after they are gathered.
  • * 1989 , William Woys Weaver, America eats: forms of edible folk art :
  • In an effort to reproduce the pickle, English cooks took to "mangoing " all sorts of substitutes, from cucumbers to unripe peaches. Americans, however, preferred baby musk melons, or, in areas where they did not grow well, bell peppers.
  • * 2008 , Beverly Ellen Schoonmaker Alfeld, Pickles To Relish (ISBN 1589804899), page 66:
  • For this cookbook, I made mangoed peppers that were not stuffed with cabbage, but stuffed with green and red tomatoes and onions.

    References

    * (bell peppers) The American Midwest: An Interpretive Encyclopedia

    Anagrams

    * ----