What is the difference between mallet and hammer?

mallet | hammer |

Mallet is a see also of hammer.


As nouns the difference between mallet and hammer

is that mallet is a small maul with a short handle, used especially for driving a tool, as a chisel or the like while hammer is a tool with a heavy head and a handle used for pounding.

As verbs the difference between mallet and hammer

is that mallet is to strike with a mallet while hammer is to strike repeatedly with a hammer, some other implement, the fist, etc.

mallet

English

(wikipedia mallet)

Noun

(en noun)
  • A type of hammer with a larger than usual head made of wood, rubber or similar non-iron material, used by woodworkers for driving a tool, such as a chisel. A kind of maul.
  • A weapon resembling the tool, but typically much larger.
  • * 1786 , Francis Grose, A Treatise on Ancient Armour and Weapons , page 51:
  • The Mallet of arms, according to the representation of it given by Father Daniel, exactly resembles the wooden instrument of that name, now in use, except in the length of the handle, it was like the hammer of arms, to be used with both hands, indeed it differed very little from that weapon in its form.
  • A light beetle with a long handle used in playing croquet.
  • The stick used to strike the ball in the sport of polo.
  • Derived terms

    * malleter * (cryptography)

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To strike with a mallet.
  • hammer

    English

    (wikipedia hammer)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A tool with a heavy head and a handle used for pounding.
  • A moving part of a firearm that strikes the firing pin to discharge a gun.
  • (anatomy) The malleus of the ear.
  • (music) In a piano or dulcimer, a piece of wood covered in felt that strikes the string.
  • (sports) A device made of a heavy steel ball attached to a length of wire, and used for throwing.
  • (curling) The last rock in an end.
  • (Ultimate Frisbee) A frisbee throwing style in which the disc is held upside-down with a forehand grip and thrown above the head.
  • Part of a clock that strikes upon a bell to indicate the hour.
  • One who, or that which, smites or shatters.
  • St. Augustine was the hammer of heresies.
  • * J. H. Newman
  • He met the stern legionaries [of Rome] who had been the massive iron hammers of the whole earth.

    Derived terms

    * ball peen hammer * claw hammer * cross peen hammer * hammer and sickle * hammerhead * hammer toe * sledgehammer * straight peen hammer * war hammer * Warrington hammer

    See also

    * mallet

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To strike repeatedly with a hammer, some other implement, the fist, etc.
  • To form or forge with a hammer; to shape by beating.
  • * Dryden
  • hammered money
  • (figuratively) To emphasize a point repeatedly.
  • (sports) To hit particularly hard.
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2010 , date=December 28 , author=Marc Vesty , title=Stoke 0 - 2 Fulham , work=BBC citation , page= , passage=This time the defender was teed up by Andrew Johnson's short free-kick on the edge of the box and Baird hammered his low drive beyond Begovic's outstretched left arm and into the bottom corner, doubling his goal tally for the season and stunning the home crowd. }}
  • To strike internally, as if hit by a hammer.
  • I could hear the engine‚Äôs valves hammering once the timing rod was thrown.
  • (figuratively, sports) To defeat (a person, a team) resoundingly
  • We hammered them 5-0!

    Derived terms

    * (adjective) * hammerer * (verb)

    See also

    * hammer out