Bat vs Mace - What's the difference?

bat | mace | Related terms |

Bat is a related term of mace.


As an acronym bat

is best available technology; a principle applying to regulations]] on limiting pollutant [[discharge|discharges.

As a verb mace is

.

bat

English

(wikipedia bat)

Etymology 1

Dialectal variant (akin to the dialectal (etyl) term (m)) of (etyl) (m), (m), from (etyl) (compare (etyl) (m), (etyl) ).

Noun

(en noun)
  • Any of the small, nocturnal, flying mammals of the order Chiroptera, which navigate by means of echolocation.
  • *
  • *:The Bat—they called him the Bat. Like a bat' he chose the night hours for his work of rapine; like a '''bat''' he struck and vanished, pouncingly, noiselessly; like a ' bat he never showed himself to the face of the day.
  • *2012 , Suemedha Sood, (bbc.co.uk) Travelwise: Texas love bats] [sic
  • *:As well as being worth millions of dollars to the Texan agriculture industry, these mammals are worth millions of dollars to the state’s tourism industry. Texas is home to the world’s largest known bat' colony (in Comal County), and the world’s largest urban '''bat''' colony (in Austin). '''Bat''' watching is a common activity, with the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department offering more ' bat -viewing sites than anywhere else in the US.
  • (lb) An old woman.
  • A whore who prowls in the dusk/evening like a bat.
  • Synonyms
    * (flying mammal)
    Derived terms
    * Batman * batlike * batshit * battish * batty * blind as a bat * fruit bat * have bats in the belfry * leaf-nosed bat * (little brown bat) * (brown bat) * like a bat out of hell * microbat * moonbat * vampire bat * vesper bat
    See also
    * * * (bat) * (Chiroptera)

    Etymology 2

    (etyl)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A club made of wood or aluminium used for striking the ball in sports such as baseball, softball and cricket.
  • A turn at hitting the ball with a bat in a game.
  • (two-up) The piece of wood on which the spinner places the coins and then uses for throwing them.Sidney J. Baker, The Australian Language , second edition, 1966, chapter XI section 3, page 242
  • (mining) Shale or bituminous shale.
  • (Kirwan)
  • A sheet of cotton used for filling quilts or comfortables; batting.
  • A part of a brick with one whole end.
  • Synonyms
    * (two-up) kip, stick, kylie, lannet
    Derived terms
    (derived terms) * baseball bat * batless * batman * bats * batsman * cricket bat

    Verb

    (batt)
  • to hit with a bat.
  • to take a turn at hitting a ball with a bat in sports like cricket, baseball and softball, as opposed to fielding.
  • to strike or swipe as though with a bat
  • The cat batted at the toy.
    Derived terms
    * bat five hundred * bat in * bat out * bat up * (verb)
    Hyponyms
    * Myotis

    References

    Etymology 3

    Possibly a variant of bate.

    Verb

  • to flutter: bat one's eyelashes .
  • Usage notes
    Most commonly used in phrase bat an eye, and variants thereof.
    Derived terms
    * bat an eye, bat an eyelash, bat an eyelid

    Etymology 4

    From (etyl) . "batman." Dictionary.com. Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1). Random House, Inc. 2009. Cognate to (m).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) packsaddle
  • Derived terms
    * batman

    References

    mace

    English

    Etymology 1

    (etyl), from (etyl) mace, mache, from ).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A heavy fighting club.
  • * 1786', The '''Mace is an ancient weapon, formerly much used by cavalry of all nations, and likewise by ecclesiastics, who in consequence of their tenures, frequently took the field, but were by a canon of the church forbidden to wield the sword. — Francis Grose, ''A Treatise on Ancient Armour and Weapons , page 51.
  • A ceremonial form of this weapon.
  • * 1598', I am a king that find thee; and I know 'Tis not the balm, the sceptre, and the ball, The sword, the '''mace , the crown imperial, The intertissued robe of gold and pearl... — William Shakespeare, ''Henvry V , Act IV, Scene I, line 259.
  • A long baton used by some drum majors to keep time and lead a marching band. If this baton is referred to as a mace, by convention it has a ceremonial often decorative head, which, if of metal, usually is hollow and sometimes intricately worked.
  • An officer who carries a mace as an emblem of authority.
  • (Macaulay)
  • A knobbed mallet used by curriers in dressing leather to make it supple.
  • (archaic) A billiard cue.
  • Verb

  • To hit someone or something with a .
  • See also
    * bludgeon * celt * twirling baton * war club

    Etymology 2

    and (etyl), meaning "a bean".

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • An old money of account in China equal to one tenth of a tael.
  • An old weight of 57.98 grains.
  • Etymology 3

    From (etyl), from re-interpretation of (m) as a plural (compare (m)); ultimately from (etyl) (m) (name of an unidentified spice).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A spice obtained from the outer layer of the kernel of the fruit of the nutmeg.
  • * 1610 , William Shakespeare, The Winter's Tale , Act IV, Scene III, line 45.
  • I must have saffron to color the warden pies; mace ; dates, none -- that's out of my note; nutmegs, seven; a race or two of ginger, but that I may beg; four pounds of prunes, and as many of raisins o' th' sun.

    Etymology 4

    From the name of one brand of the spray, (m).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A common name for some types of tear gas.
  • By extension, a common name for some types of pepper spray.
  • By generalization, a name for personal tear gas and pepper spray.
  • Verb

  • To spray in defense or attack with mace (pepper spray, or, tear gas) using a hand-held device.
  • (informal) To spray a similar noxious chemical in defense or attack using an available hand-held device such as an aerosol spray can.
  • * 1989 , Carl Hiaasen, Skin Tight , Ballantine Books, New York, chapter 22:
  • When Reynaldo and Willie had burst into Larkey's drug store to confront him, the old man had maced Willie square in the eyes with an aerosol can of spermicidal birth-control foam.

    References

    (Webster 1913)

    Anagrams

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