Hoist vs Lug - What's the difference?

hoist | lug | Related terms |

Hoist is a related term of lug.


As a verb hoist

is to raise; to lift; to elevate; especially, to raise or lift to a desired elevation, by means of tackle or pulley, as a sail, a flag, a heavy package or weight.

As a noun hoist

is a hoisting device, such as pulley or crane.

As an initialism lug is

(computing) (linux) user group.

hoist

English

Verb

  • To raise; to lift; to elevate; especially, to raise or lift to a desired elevation, by means of tackle or pulley, as a sail, a flag, a heavy package or weight.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • They land my goods, and hoist my flying sails.
  • * South
  • hoisting him into his father's throne
  • * 1719:
  • ...but this last was so heavy, I could not hoist it up to get it over the ship's side.
  • * 1883 , (Robert Louis Stevenson), (Treasure Island)
  • Between us, with much trouble, we managed to hoist him upstairs, and laid him on his bed, where his head fell back on the pillow, as if he were almost fainting.
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=October 23 , author=Tom Fordyce , title=2011 Rugby World Cup final: New Zealand 8-7 France , work=BBC Sport citation , page= , passage=And when skipper Richie McCaw hoisted the Webb Ellis Trophy high into the night, a quarter of a century of hurt was blown away in an explosion of fireworks and cheering.}}
  • (historical) To lift someone up to be flogged.
  • To be lifted up.
  • (comptheory) To extract (code) from a loop construct as part of optimization.
  • Usage notes

    * "Hoisted" is about fifteen times more common than "hoist" in US usage as past and past participle. The "hoist" form is also uncommon in the UK except in the expression "hoist by one's own petard".

    Quotations

    * They land my goods, and hoist my flying sails . — * Hoisting him into his father’s throne . —

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A hoisting device, such as pulley or crane.
  • The act of hoisting; a lift.
  • Give me a hoist over that wall.
  • The perpendicular height of a flag, as opposed to the fly, or horizontal length, when flying from a staff.
  • The vertical edge of a flag which is next to the staff.
  • The height of a fore-and-aft sail, next the mast or stay.
  • lug

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The act of hauling or dragging.
  • a hard lug
  • That which is hauled or dragged.
  • The pack is a heavy lug .
  • Anything that moves slowly.
  • (Ascham)
  • A lug nut.
  • (electricity) A device for terminating an electrical conductor to facilitate the mechanical connection; to the conductor it may be crimped to form a cold weld, soldered or have pressure from a screw.
  • A part of something which sticks out, used as a handle or support.
  • A fool, a large man.
  • (UK) An ear or ear lobe.
  • A wood box used for transporting fruit or vegetables.
  • (slang) A request for money, as for political purposes.
  • They put the lug on him at the courthouse.
  • (UK, dialect) A rod or pole.
  • (Wright)
  • (UK, dialect) A measure of length equal to 16½ feet.
  • * Spenser
  • Eight lugs of ground.
  • (nautical) A lugsail.
  • (harness) The leather loop or ear by which a shaft is held up.
  • A lugworm.
  • Derived terms

    * (lug nut) lug nut * (large man) big lug * (protruding support) launch lug

    Verb

  • To haul or drag along (especially something heavy); to carry.
  • Why do you always lug around so many books?
  • * Collier
  • They must divide the image among them, and so lug off every one his share.
  • To run at too slow a speed.
  • When driving up a hill, choose a lower gear so you don't lug the engine.
  • (nautical) To carry an excessive amount of sail for the conditions prevailing.
  • Derived terms

    * luggage

    References

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