Lurry vs Lorry - What's the difference?

lurry | lorry |


In lang=en terms the difference between lurry and lorry

is that lurry is to hurry carelessly while lorry is to soil, dirty, bespatter with mud or the like.

In obsolete|lang=en terms the difference between lurry and lorry

is that lurry is (obsolete) a confused heap; a throng or jumble, as of people or sounds while lorry is (obsolete) a large low horse-drawn wagon.

As verbs the difference between lurry and lorry

is that lurry is to lug or pull about or lurry can be to hurry carelessly while lorry is to soil, dirty, bespatter with mud or the like.

As nouns the difference between lurry and lorry

is that lurry is (obsolete) a confused heap; a throng or jumble, as of people or sounds while lorry is (british) a motor vehicle for transporting goods; a truck.

lurry

English

Etymology 1

Of obscure origin. See (l).

Verb

  • To lug or pull about.
  • To daub; dirty.
  • Etymology 2

    (etyl) precipitant.

    Noun

    (lurries)
  • (obsolete) A confused heap; a throng or jumble, as of people or sounds.
  • To turn prayer into a kind of lurry . — Milton.

    Verb

  • To hurry carelessly.
  • (Webster 1913)

    lorry

    English

    Alternative forms

    * (l), (l)

    Noun

    (lorries)
  • (British) A motor vehicle for transporting goods; a truck.
  • (obsolete) A large low horse-drawn wagon.
  • (dated) A small cart or wagon, as used on the tramways in mines to carry coal or rubbish.
  • (dated) A barrow or truck for shifting baggage, as at railway stations.
  • Synonyms

    * (motor vehicle for goods transport) rig, tractor trailer, truck (US), hauler

    Descendants

    * Malay: (l)

    Verb

  • To soil, dirty, bespatter with mud or the like.