What's the difference between
and
Enter two words to compare and contrast their definitions, origins, and synonyms to better understand how those words are related.

Rent vs Loan - What's the difference?

rent | loan |

As nouns the difference between loan and rent

is that loan is a sum of money or other valuables or consideration that an individual, group or other legal entity borrows from another individual, group or legal entity (the latter often being a financial institution) with the condition that it be returned or repaid at a later date (sometimes with interest) while rent is a payment made by a tenant at intervals in order to occupy a property.

As verbs the difference between loan and rent

is that loan is to lend (something) to (someone) while rent is to occupy premises in exchange for rent.

rent

English

Etymology 1

(etyl) rente, from .

Noun

(en noun)
  • A payment made by a tenant at intervals in order to occupy a property.
  • * , chapter=17
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=This time was most dreadful for Lilian. Thrown on her own resources and almost penniless, she maintained herself and paid the rent of a wretched room near the hospital by working as a charwoman, sempstress, anything.}}
  • A similar payment for the use of equipment or a service.
  • (economics) A profit from possession of a valuable right, as a restricted license to engage in a trade or business.
  • An object for which rent is charged or paid.
  • (obsolete) income; revenue
  • * Gower
  • [Bacchus] a waster was and all his rent / In wine and bordel he dispent.
  • * (Alexander Pope)
  • So bought an annual rent or two, / And liv'd, just as you see I do.
    Derived terms
    * rental * renting * rent strike

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To occupy premises in exchange for rent.
  • To grant occupation in return for rent.
  • To obtain or have temporary possession of an object (e.g. a movie) in exchange for money.
  • To be leased or let for rent.
  • The house rents for five hundred dollars a month.

    Etymology 2

    (etyl) . Variant form of renden.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A tear or rip in some surface.
  • * 1913 ,
  • The brown paint on the door was so old that the naked wood showed between the rents .
  • A division or schism.
  • Verb

    (head)
  • (rend)
  • loan

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) lone, lane, from (etyl) . More at (l).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (banking, finance) A sum of money or other valuables or consideration that an individual, group or other legal entity borrows from another individual, group or legal entity (the latter often being a financial institution) with the condition that it be returned or repaid at a later date (sometimes with interest).
  • *
  • , title=The Mirror and the Lamp , chapter=2 citation , passage=That the young Mr. Churchills liked—but they did not like him coming round of an evening and drinking weak whisky-and-water while he held forth on railway debentures and corporation loans . Mr. Barrett, however, by fawning and flattery, seemed to be able to make not only Mrs. Churchill but everyone else do what he desired.}}
  • The contract and array of legal or ethical obligations surrounding a loan.
  • The permission to borrow any item.
  • Hypernyms
    * (something that a legal entity borrows) bailment
    Hyponyms
    * (something that a legal entity borrows) mutuum
    Derived terms
    * bridge loan * caveat loan * loan shark * low-doc loan * swing loan

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To lend (something) to (someone).
  • * 2006: — (unidentified episode, but frequently heard from her as a verb)
  • When you loan somebody something, they have the responsibility to safeguard it.
    Usage notes
    * This usage, once widespread in the UK, is now confined to the US (or perhaps parts thereof). * It is often considered preferable to use lend when the object being loaned or lent is something other than money.

    Etymology 2

    See lawn.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (Scotland) A lonnen.
  • (Webster 1913)

    Anagrams

    * ----