Bag vs Liner - What's the difference?

bag | liner |


As a noun bag

is a flexible container made of cloth, paper, plastic, etc.

As a verb bag

is to put into a bag.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

bag

English

(wikipedia bag)

Noun

(en noun)
  • A flexible container made of cloth, paper, plastic, etc.
  • (label) A handbag
  • A suitcase.
  • A schoolbag, especially a backpack.
  • One’s preference.
  • (label) An ugly woman.
  • (label) The cloth-covered pillow used for first, second, and third base.
  • (label) First, second, or third base.
  • (label) A breathalyzer, so named because it formerly had a plastic bag over the end to measure a set amount of breath.
  • (label) A collection of objects, disregarding order, but (unlike a set) in which elements may be repeated.
  • A sac in animal bodies, containing some fluid or other substance.
  • A sort of silken purse formerly tied about men's hair behind, by way of ornament.
  • The quantity of game bagged in a hunt.
  • A scrotum.
  • (label) A unit of measure of cement equal to 94 pounds.
  • Synonyms

    * (flexible container) poke (obsolete), sack, tote * (handbag) handbag, purse (US) * (preference) cup of tea, thing * (ugly woman) dog, hag * (in mathematics) multiset

    Hyponyms

    * (flexible container) bindle

    Verb

    (bagg)
  • To put into a bag.
  • To catch or kill, especially when fishing or hunting.
  • To gain possession of something, or to make first claim on something.
  • (label) To furnish or load with a bag.
  • * Dryden
  • To bring a woman one met on the street with one.
  • To laugh uncontrollably.
  • To criticise sarcastically.
  • (label) To provide artificial ventilation with a bag valve mask (BVM) resuscitator.
  • To swell or hang down like a full bag.
  • To swell with arrogance.
  • (Chaucer)
  • To become pregnant.
  • Derived terms

    {{der3, airbag, air bag , bagboy , baggage , bagger , baggy , bag lady , bag lunch , bag of bones , bag of tricks , bag snatcher , beanbag , binbag , carrier bag , clutch bag , dilly bag , dime bag , doggy bag , double bagger , douche bag , dumb as a bag of hammers , face like a bag of spanners , handbag , gladstone bag , goody bag, goodie bag , grab bag , holdall, carryall, tote, tote bag , in the bag , kitbag , let the cat out of the bag , mixed bag , moneybag , overnight bag , paper bag , plastic bag , schoolbag , shopping bag , shoulder bag , sickbag , sleeping bag , teabag , toolbag , windbag}}

    Descendants

    * Korean:

    Anagrams

    * * * * 1000 English basic words ----

    liner

    English

    Etymology 1

    From line (verb).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Someone who fits a lining to something.
  • a liner of shoes
  • * 1973', A good '''liner has a pretty shrewd idea of the value of the painting he is treating and usually charges accordingly. — Kyril Bonfiglioli, ''Don't Point That Thing at Me (Penguin 2001, p. 41)
  • A removable cover or lining
  • I threw out the trash can liner .
  • The pamphlet which is contained inside an album of music or movie
  • Does it have the lyrics in the liner notes?
  • A lining within the cylinder of a steam engine, in which the piston works and between which and the outer shell of the cylinder a space is left to form a steam jacket.
  • A slab on which small pieces of marble, tile, etc., are fastened for grinding.
  • Etymology 2

    From line (noun).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A large passenger-carrying ship, especially one on a regular route; an ocean liner.
  • * {{quote-book, year=1963, author=(Margery Allingham)
  • , title=(The China Governess) , chapter=Foreword citation , passage=He turned back to the scene before him and the enormous new block of council dwellings. The design was some way after Corbusier but the block was built up on plinths and resembled an Atlantic liner swimming diagonally across the site.}}
  • (nautical)  A ship of the line.
  • (baseball)  A line drive.
  • The liner glanced off the pitcher's foot.
  • (marketing, slang)  A basic salesperson.
  • (in combination)  Something with a specified number of lines.
  • * 2005 , G. J. H. Van Gelder, Close Relationships (page 130)
  • the following three-liner by an unknown poet
    Derived terms
    * ocean liner * one-liner

    See also

    * airliner