Abandon vs Limit - What's the difference?

abandon | limit |


As nouns the difference between abandon and limit

is that abandon is a yielding to natural impulses or inhibitions; freedom from artificial constraint, with loss of appreciation of consequences while limit is limit (restriction).

As a verb abandon

is (obsolete) to subdue; to take control of .

As an adverb abandon

is (obsolete|not comparable) freely; entirely.

abandon

English

Etymology 1

* From (etyl) abandounen, from (etyl) abandoner, formed from . See also (l), (l). * Displaced (etyl) forleten .

Verb

(en verb)
  • (obsolete) To subdue; to take control of.
  • To give up control of, to surrender or to give oneself over, or to yield to one's emotions.
  • * Macaulay
  • He abandoned himself to his favourite vice.
  • To desist in doing, practicing, following, holding, or adhering to; to turn away from; to permit to lapse; to renounce; to discontinue.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-05-17
  • , author=George Monbiot, authorlink=George Monbiot , title=Money just makes the rich suffer , volume=188, issue=23, page=19 , magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , url=http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2013/may/06/politics-envy-keenest-rich , passage=In order to grant the rich these pleasures, the social contract is reconfigured.
  • To leave behind; to desert as in a ship or a position, typically in response to overwhelming odds or impending dangers; to forsake, in spite of a duty or responsibility.
  • * (rfdate) I. Taylor:
  • Hope was overthrown, yet could not be abandoned .
    Many baby girls have been abandoned on the streets of Beijing.
  • (obsolete) To cast out; to banish; to expel; to reject.
  • * 1594 , , The Taming of the Shrew , act I, scene ii:
  • Being all this time abandoned from your bed.
  • * Udall
  • that he might abandon them from him
  • To no longer exercise a right, title, or interest, especially with no interest of reclaiming it again; to yield; to relinquish.
  • To surrender to the insurer the insured item, so as to claim a total loss.
  • Synonyms
    (synonyms of "abandon") * abdicate * blin * cede * desert * forego * forlet * forsake * give up * leave * quit * relinquish * renounce * resign * retire * surrender * withdraw from * withsake * yield
    Derived terms
    (terms derived from "abandon") * aband * abandoned * abandonee * abandoner * abandonware

    Etymology 2

    * From (etyl), from (etyl) abandon, from abondonner.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A yielding to natural impulses or inhibitions; freedom from artificial constraint, with loss of appreciation of consequences. .
  • * 1954 , , Messiah :
  • I envy those chroniclers who assert with reckless but sincere abandon : 'I was there. I saw it happen. It happened thus.'
  • * 2007 , Akiva Goldsman and Mark Protosevich, :
  • They needed to have an abandon in their performance that you just can’t get out of people in the middle of the night when they’re barefoot.
  • (obsolete) abandonment; relinquishment.
  • Synonyms
    * (giving up to impulses) wantonness, unrestraint, libertinism, abandonment, profligacy, unconstraint

    Adverb

    (en adverb)
  • (obsolete, not comparable) Freely; entirely.
  • * 1330 , Arthour and Merlin :
  • His ribbes and scholder fel adoun,/Men might se the liver abandoun .

    References

    ----

    limit

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl), from (etyl), from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A restriction; a bound beyond which one may not go.
  • There are several existing limits to executive power.
    Two drinks is my limit tonight.
  • * 1839 , (Charles Dickens), Nicholas Nickleby , chapter 21:
  • It is the conductor which communicates to the inhabitants of regions beyond its limit ,
  • * 1922 , , Ulysses , episode 17:
  • Ever he would wander, selfcompelled, to the extreme limit of his cometary orbit, beyond the fixed stars and variable suns and telescopic planets, astronomical waifs and strays, to the extreme boundary of space,
  • * 2012 March 6, Dan McCrum, Nicole Bullock and Guy Chazan, Financial Times , “Utility buyout loses power in shale gas revolution”:
  • At the time, there seemed to be no limit to the size of ever-larger private equity deals, with banks falling over each other to arrange financing on generous terms and to invest money from their own private equity arms.
  • (mathematics) A value to which a sequence converges. Equivalently, the common value of the upper limit and the lower limit of a sequence: if the upper and lower limits are different, then the sequence has no limit (i.e., does not converge).
  • The sequence of reciprocals has zero as its limit.
  • (mathematics) Any of several abstractions of this concept of limit.
  • Category theory defines a very general concept of limit.
  • (category theory) Given diagram F'' : ''J'' → ''C'', a cone (''L'', ''φ'') from ''L'' ∈ Ob(''C'') to ''F'' is the ''limit'' of ''F'' if it has the universal property that for any other cone (''N'', ''ψ'') from ''N'' ∈ Ob(''C'') to ''F'' there is a unique morphism ''u'' : ''N'' → ''L'' such that for all ''X'' ∈ Ob(''J ), \phi_X \circ u = \psi_X .
  • (poker) Short for fixed limit.
  • The final, utmost, or furthest point; the border or edge.
  • the limit of a walk, of a town, or of a country
  • * Alexander Pope
  • As eager of the chase, the maid / Beyond the forest's verdant limits strayed.
  • (obsolete) The space or thing defined by limits.
  • * Shakespeare
  • The archdeacon hath divided it / Into three limits very equally.
  • (obsolete) That which terminates a period of time; hence, the period itself; the full time or extent.
  • * Shakespeare
  • the dateless limit of thy dear exile
  • * Shakespeare
  • The limit of your lives is out.
  • (obsolete) A restriction; a check or curb; a hindrance.
  • * Shakespeare
  • I prithee, give no limits to my tongue.
  • (logic, metaphysics) A determining feature; a distinguishing characteristic.
  • Synonyms
    * (restriction) bound, boundary, limitation, restriction
    Derived terms
    * age limit * central limit theorem * city limits * elastic limit * in the limit * limit down * limit up * limitation * limitless * lower limit * outer limit * the sky is the limit * to the limit * time limit * unlimited * upper limit
    Descendants
    * German: (l)

    See also

    * bound * function

    Adjective

    (-)
  • (poker) Being a fixed limit game.
  • Etymology 2

    From (etyl) ; see noun.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To restrict; not to allow to go beyond a certain bound.
  • *
  • [The Chinese government] has jailed environmental activists and is planning to limit the power of judicial oversight by handing a state-approved body a monopoly over bringing environmental lawsuits.
  • (mathematics) To have a limit in a particular set.
  • (obsolete) To beg, or to exercise functions, within a certain limited region.
  • Synonyms
    * (restrict) cap; restrict; withstrain