Shore vs Levee - What's the difference?

shore | levee |


As a proper noun shore

is .

As a verb levee is

.

shore

English

(wikipedia shore)

Etymology 1

From (etyl), from (etyl). Cognate to (etyl) .

Noun

(en noun)
  • Land adjoining a non-flowing body of water, such as an ocean, lake or pond.
  • * (Edmund Spenser) (c.1552–1599)
  • the fruitful shore of muddy Nile
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=8 , passage=Now we plunged into a deep shade with the boughs lacing each other overhead, and crossed dainty, rustic bridges
  • (from the perspective of one on a body of water) Land, usually near a port.
  • Usage notes
    * Generally, only the largest of rivers, which are often estuaries, are said to have shores . * Rivers and other flowing bodies of water are said to have (term). * River bank(s)'' outnumbers ''River shore(s) about 200:3 at COCA.
    Hyponyms
    * (land adjoining a large body of water) beach, headland, coast
    Derived terms
    * alongshore * ashore * backshore * bayshore * foreshore * inshore * lakeshore * lee shore * longshore * nearshore * onshore * offshore * seashore * shore bug * shore cod * shore crab * shore dinner * shore fly * shore lark * shore leave * shore patrol * shore pine * shore pit viper * shore plover * shore plum * shore snipe * shore thistle * shore teetan * shorebird * (adjective) * shoreface * shorefront * shoreland * shoreless * shoreline * shoreside * shoreward * shorewards * shoreweed * weather shore * windward shore

    Verb

    (shor)
  • (obsolete) To set on shore.
  • (Shakespeare)
    (Webster 1913)

    Etymology 2

    Of uncertain origin, but found in some other Germanic languages; compare Middle Dutch . http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/shore?s=t

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A prop or strut supporting the weight or flooring above it.
  • The shores stayed upright during the earthquake.

    Verb

    (shor)
  • To provide with support.
  • *
  • *
  • *
  • *
  • To reinforce (something at risk of failure).
  • My family shored me up after I failed the GED.
    The workers were shoring up the dock after part of it fell into the water.
  • *
  • Synonyms
    * reinforce, strengthen, support, buttress * prop up, bolster
    Derived terms
    * dogshore * shore up * shorer * (noun) * unshored

    Etymology 3

    See (shear)

    Verb

    (head)
  • (shear)
  • Etymology 4

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete, UK, dialect) A sewer.
  • References

    (Webster 1913)

    Anagrams

    *

    levee

    English

    (wikipedia levee)

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • An embankment to prevent inundation; as, the levees along the Mississippi.
  • (US) The steep bank of a river, or border of an irrigated field.
  • (US) A pier or other landing place on a river.
  • Synonyms
    * (embankment) dike, floodwall

    Verb

  • (US) To keep within a channel by means of levees.
  • to levee a river

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) The act of rising; getting up, especially in the morning after rest.
  • * Gray
  • the sun's levee
  • * 1749 , Henry Fielding, Tom Jones , Folio Society 1973, p. 414:
  • The sturdy hind now attends the levee of his fellow-labourer the ox
  • A reception of visitors held after getting up.
  • A formal reception, especially one given by royalty or other leaders.
  • * {{quote-book
  • , year=1992 , year_published=1993 , author= Hilary Mantel , title=A Place of Greater Safety citation , isbn=9780689121685 , page=195 , passage=At the King's levee on the morning of the 13th, Philippe was first ignored; then asked by His Majesty (rudely) what he wanted; then told, ‘Get back where you came from.’ }}

    Verb

  • To attend the levee or levees of.
  • * Young
  • He levees all the great.
    ----