Feud vs Leud - What's the difference?

feud | leud |


As nouns the difference between feud and leud

is that feud is a state of long-standing mutual hostility or feud can be an estate granted to a vassal by a feudal lord in exchange for service while leud is a vassal or tenant in the early middle ages.

As a verb feud

is to carry on a feud.

feud

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) fede, feide, , ultimately from the same Germanic source. Related to (l), (l).

Alternative forms

* fede (obsolete)

Noun

(en noun)
  • A state of long-standing mutual hostility.
  • ''You couldn't call it a feud exactly, but there had always been a chill between Phil Mickelson and Tiger Woods.
  • (professional wrestling slang) A staged rivalry between wrestlers.
  • (obsolete) A combination of kindred to avenge injuries or affronts, done or offered to any of their blood, on the offender and all his race.
  • Verb

    (en verb)
  • To carry on a feud.
  • ''The two men began to feud after one of them got a job promotion and the other thought he was more qualified.

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl), from (etyl) feodum.

    Alternative forms

    * feod

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • An estate granted to a vassal by a feudal lord in exchange for service
  • Synonyms
    * fee * fief

    leud

    English

    Noun

    (en-noun)
  • a vassal or tenant in the early Middle Ages
  • Synonyms

    * (l)

    Anagrams

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