Letch vs Letch - What's the difference?

letch | letch |


In archaic|lang=en terms the difference between letch and letch

is that letch is (archaic) strong desire; passion while letch is (archaic) strong desire; passion.

In informal|lang=en terms the difference between letch and letch

is that letch is (informal) someone with an overly strong sexual desire while letch is (informal) someone with an overly strong sexual desire.

In alternative form of|leach|lang=en terms the difference between letch and letch

is that letch is while letch is .

As nouns the difference between letch and letch

is that letch is (archaic) strong desire; passion or letch can be a stream or pool in boggy land or letch can be while letch is (archaic) strong desire; passion or letch can be a stream or pool in boggy land or letch can be .

As verbs the difference between letch and letch

is that letch is while letch is .

letch

English

Alternative forms

* lech

Etymology 1

See (lech), (lecher).

Noun

(es)
  • (archaic) Strong desire; passion.
  • Some people have a letch for unmasking impostors, or for avenging the wrongs of others. — De Quincey.
  • (informal) Someone with an overly strong sexual desire.
  • Etymology 2

    From loec'' - later ''lache'', variant ''letch - for example Sandy's Letch located east of Annitsford in Northumberland.

    Noun

    (es)
  • A stream or pool in boggy land.
  • Etymology 3

    Noun

    (es)
  • Verb

    (es)
  • (Webster 1913)

    letch

    English

    Alternative forms

    * lech

    Etymology 1

    See (lech), (lecher).

    Noun

    (es)
  • (archaic) Strong desire; passion.
  • Some people have a letch for unmasking impostors, or for avenging the wrongs of others. — De Quincey.
  • (informal) Someone with an overly strong sexual desire.
  • Etymology 2

    From loec'' - later ''lache'', variant ''letch - for example Sandy's Letch located east of Annitsford in Northumberland.

    Noun

    (es)
  • A stream or pool in boggy land.
  • Etymology 3

    Noun

    (es)
  • Verb

    (es)
  • (Webster 1913)