Come vs Learn - What's the difference?

come | learn |


As verbs the difference between come and learn

is that come is to (to consume food) while learn is to acquire, or attempt to acquire knowledge or an ability to do something or learn can be .

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

come

English

(wikipedia come)

Verb

  • (label) To move from further away to nearer to.
  • * (William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • Look, who comes yonder?
  • * (1809-1892)
  • I did not come to curse thee.
  • # To move towards the speaker.
  • # To move towards the listener.
  • # To move towards the object that is the of the sentence.
  • # (label) To move towards the or subject of the main clause.
  • # To move towards an unstated agent.
  • (label) To arrive.
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=5 , passage=Then came a maid with hand-bag and shawls, and after her a tall young lady. She stood for a moment holding her skirt above the grimy steps,
  • (label) To appear, to manifest itself.
  • * (1613-1680), (Hudibras)
  • when butter does refuse to come [i.e. to form]
  • (label) To take a position to something else in a sequence.
  • To achieve orgasm; to cum.
  • To approach a state of being or accomplishment.
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=3 , passage=Now all this was very fine, but not at all in keeping with the Celebrity's character as I had come' to conceive it. The idea that adulation ever cloyed on him was ludicrous in itself. In fact I thought the whole story fishy, and ' came very near to saying so.}}
  • To take a particular approach or point of view in regard to something.
  • To become, to turn out to be.
  • * (William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • How come you thus estranged?
  • (label) To be supplied, or made available; to exist.
  • (label) To carry through; to succeed in.
  • (label) Happen.
  • *{{quote-magazine, date=2014-06-14, volume=411, issue=8891, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= It's a gas , passage=But out of sight is out of mind. And that
  • To have a social background.
  • # To be or have been a resident or native.
  • # To have been brought up by or employed by.
  • To germinate.
  • Usage notes

    In its general sense, come'' specifically marks motion towards the (whether explicitly stated or not). Its counterpart, usually referring to motion away from or not involving the deictic centre, is ''go''. For example, the sentence "Come to the tree" implies contextually that the speaker is already at the tree - "Go to the tree" often implies that the speaker is elsewhere. Either the speaker or the listener can be the deictic centre - the sentences "I will go to you" and "I will come to you" are both valid, depending on the exact nuances of the context. When there is no clear speaker or listener, the deictic centre is usually the focus of the sentence or the topic of the piece of writing. "Millions of people came''' to America from Europe" would be used in an article about America, but "Millions of people ' went to America from Europe" would be used in an article about Europe. When used with adverbs of location, come'' is usually paired with ''here'' or ''hither''. In interrogatives, ''come'' usually indicates a question about source - "Where are you coming from?" - while ''go indicates a question about destination - "Where are you going?" or "Where are you going to?" A few old texts use comen as the past participle. The phrase "dream come true" is a set phrase; the verb "come" in the sense "become" is archaic outside of that set phrase and the collocation "come about". The collocations “come with” and “come along” mean accompany, used as “Do you want to come with me?” and “Do you want to come along?” In the Midwestern American dialect, “come with” can occur without a following object, as in “Do you want to come with?” In this dialect, “with” can also be used in this way with some other verbs, such as “take with”. Examples of this may be found in plays by Chicagoan (David Mamet), such as (American Buffalo). Chicago Dialect This objectless use is not permissible in other dialects.

    Antonyms

    *

    Derived terms

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    See also

    * cam'st * kingdom come

    Noun

    (-)
  • (obsolete) Coming, arrival; approach.
  • * 1869 , RD Blackmoore, Lorna Doone , II:
  • “If we count three before the come of thee, thwacked thou art, and must go to the women.”
  • (slang) Semen, or female ejaculatory discharge.
  • See also

    * cum

    Preposition

    (English prepositions)
  • Leave it to settle for about three months and, come Christmas time, you'll have a delicious concoctions to offer your guests.
    Come retirement, their Social Security may turn out to be a lot less than they counted on.
  • * '>citation
  • Come the final whistle, Mikel Arteta lay flabbergasted on the turf.

    Usage notes

    * is often used when both the indicated event, period or change in state occurred in the past.

    Interjection

    (en interjection)
  • An exclamation to express annoyance.
  • :
  • An exclamation to express encouragement, or to precede a request.
  • :
  • *
  • *:“I'm through with all pawn-games,” I laughed. “Come , let us have a game of lansquenet. Either I will take a farewell fall out of you or you will have your sevenfold revenge”.
  • References

    learn

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) lernen, from (etyl) . Compare (etyl) lernen.

    Verb

  • To acquire, or attempt to acquire knowledge or an ability to do something.
  • To attend a course or other educational activity.
  • * 1719 ,
  • For, as he took delight to introduce me, I took delight to learn.
  • To gain knowledge from a bad experience.
  • learn from one's mistakes
  • To be studying.
  • To come to know; to become informed of; to find out.
  • He just learned that he will be sacked.
    Usage notes
    * See other, dated and regional, sense of below.
    Synonyms
    * (l)
    Antonyms
    * (l) * (l)
    Derived terms
    * (l) * (l)

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) . Compare Dutch leren, German (m).

    Verb

  • *:
  • *:And whan she had serched hym / she fond in the bottome of his wound that therin was poyson / And soo she heled hym/ and therfore Tramtrist cast grete loue to la beale Isoud / for she was at that tyme the fairest mayde and lady of the worlde / And there Tramtryst lerned her to harpe / and she beganne to haue grete fantasye vnto hym
  • *1599 , (William Shakespeare), (Much Ado About Nothing) ,
  • *:Sweet prince, you learn me noble thankfulness.
  • *circa 1611 , (William Shakespeare), (Cymbeline), :
  • *:Have I not been / Thy pupil long? Hast thou not learn’d me how / To make perfumes?
  • *1993 , The Simpsons , (18 Feb. 1993) Lisa's thoughts:
  • *:That'll learn him to bust my tomater.
  • Usage notes
    Now often considered non-standard.
    Derived terms
    * (l)

    References

    * * * Family Word Finder Readers Digest Association Inc. NY 1975