Keen vs Lean - What's the difference?

keen | lean |


As an adjective keen

is showing a quick and ardent willingness or responsiveness, enthusiastic, eager; interested, intense.

As a verb keen

is (rare) to sharpen; to make cold or keen can be to utter a keen.

As a noun keen

is a prolonged wail for a deceased person.

As a proper noun lean is

.

keen

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) . More at (l), (l).

Alternative forms

* keene, kene (archaic)

Adjective

(er)
  • showing a quick and ardent willingness or responsiveness, enthusiastic, eager; interested, intense.
  • vehement; fierce; as, a keen appetite.
  • * (rfdate),
  • Of full keen will.
  • * (rfdate), Shakespeare
  • So keen and greedy to confound a man.
  • sharp; having a fine edge or point.
  • * (rfdate) :
  • That my keen knife see not the wound it makes.
  • acute of mind; sharp; penetrating; having or expressing mental acuteness.
  • * (rfdate),
  • To make our wits more keen .
  • * (rfdate),
  • Before the keen inquiry of her thought.
  • bitter; piercing; acrimonious; cutting; stinging; severe; as, keen satire or sarcasm.
  • * (rfdate)
  • Good father cardinal, cry thou amen to my keen curses.
  • piercing; penetrating; cutting; sharp; -- applied to cold, wind, etc,; as, a keen wind; the cold is very keen.
  • * (rfdate),
  • Breasts the keen air, and carols as he goes.
  • Enthusiastic
  • I'm keen to learn another language.
    I'm keen on learning another language.
    I'm keen on languages.
    I'm keen about learning languages.
    I'm keen for help.
    ''"Do you want to learn another language?" / "I'm keen ."
  • (US, informal, dated) Marvelous.
  • I just got this peachy keen new dress.
  • (UK) extremely low as to be competitive.
  • keen prices
  • (obsolete) brave, courageous; bold, audacious.
  • Usage notes
    * Keen is often used in the composition of words, most of which are of obvious signification; as, keen-edged, keen-eyed, keen-sighted, keen-witted, etc.
    Synonyms
    * prompt; eager; ardent; sharp; acute; cutting; penetrating; biting; severe; sarcastic; satirical; piercing; shrewd. * See also
    Derived terms
    * keen-witted * keen as mustard * keen on * keenly * keenness

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (rare) To sharpen; to make cold.
  • * (rfdate), Thomson.
  • Cold winter keens the brightening flood.

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A prolonged wail for a deceased person.
  • * '>citation
  • Verb

    (en verb)
  • To utter a keen.
  • * (rfdate) Stuart Howard-Jones (1904-1974), Hibernia.'' Collected in ''The New Oxford Book of English Light Verse, 1978.
  • Keen —meaning 'brisk'? Nay, here the Language warps:
    'Tis singing bawdy Ballads to a Corpse.
  • To utter with a loud wailing voice or wordless cry.
  • *
  • To mourn.
  • *
  • Anagrams

    * ----

    lean

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) ; via Proto-Indo-European with climate, cline.

    Verb

  • To incline, deviate, or bend, from a vertical position; to be in a position thus inclining or deviating.
  • To incline in opinion or desire; to conform in conduct; with to'', ''toward , etc.
  • * (Edmund Spenser) (c.1552–1599)
  • They delight rather to lean to their old customs.
  • To rest or rely, for support, comfort, etc.; with on'', ''upon'', or ''against .
  • * (1809-1892)
  • He leaned not on his fathers but himself.
  • * , chapter=23
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=The slightest effort made the patient cough. He would stand leaning on a stick and holding a hand to his side, and when the paroxysm had passed it left him shaking.}}
  • To hang outwards.
  • To press against.
  • * (John Dryden) (1631-1700)
  • His fainting limbs against an oak he leant .
    Derived terms
    * lean back * leaning * lean on * lean-to

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) .

    Adjective

    (er)
  • (of a person or animal) slim; not fleshy.
  • (of meat) having little fat.
  • Having little extra or little to spare; scanty; meagre.
  • a lean''' budget; a '''lean harvest
  • Of a fuel-air mixture, having more air than is necessary to burn all of the fuel; more air- or oxygen- rich than necessary for a stoichiometric reaction.
  • (printing, archaic) Of a character which prevents the compositor from earning the usual wages; opposed to fat.
  • lean copy, matter, or type
    Synonyms
    * See also

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To thin out (a fuel-air mixture): to reduce the fuel flow into the mixture so that there is more air or oxygen.
  • * {{quote-magazine
  • , year=1938 , month=July , author=Blaine and Dupont Miller , title=Weather Hop , page=25 , magazine=Boy's Life , publisher=Boy Scouts of America , issn=0006-8608 citation , passage=He leaned the mixture in an effort to cause a backfire through the carburetor, the generally accepted method of breaking the ice loose. }}
  • * {{quote-magazine
  • , year=2002 , month=July , author=Tom Benenson , title=Can Your Engine Run Too Lean? , volume=129 , issue=7 , page=73 , magazine=Flying , issn=0015-4806 citation , passage=Even the Pilot's Operating Handbooks (POH) for our training airplanes add to our paranoia with their insistence that we not lean the mixture until we're above 5000 feet density altitude. }}

    Etymology 3

    Icelandic (leyna)?; akin to (etyl) word for "deny". Compare .

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To conceal.
  • (Ray)

    See also

    *

    References

    * *