Lawe vs Lawn - What's the difference?

lawe | lawn |


As a noun lawe

is .

As a verb lawe

is to cut off the claws and balls of (eg a dog's forefeet).

As a proper noun lawn is

a town in newfoundland and labrador.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

lawe

English

Etymology 1

Noun

(en noun)
  • Etymology 2

    Verb

  • To cut off the claws and balls of (e.g. a dog's forefeet).
  • (Wright)
    (Webster 1913)

    Anagrams

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    lawn

    English

    (wikipedia lawn)

    Etymology 1

    Early Modern English "; Old Norse & Old English land

    Noun

  • An open space between woods.
  • Ground (generally in front of or around a house) covered with grass kept closely mown.
  • * , chapter=1
  • , title= Mr. Pratt's Patients, chapter=1 , passage=Pretty soon I struck into a sort of path […]. It twisted and turned,
  • (lb) An overgrown agar culture, such that no separation between single colonies exists.
  • Derived terms
    * lawn mower * lawned

    Etymology 2

    Apparently from (Laon) , a town in France known for its linen manufacturing.

    Noun

  • (uncountable) A type of thin linen or cotton.
  • * 1897 , (Bram Stoker), Dracula :
  • The stream had trickled over her chin and stained the purity of her lawn death robe.
  • * 1939 , (Raymond Chandler), The Big Sleep , Penguin 2011, p. 144:
  • He looked through the glass at the fire, set it down on the end of the desk and wiped his lips with a sheer lawn handkerchief.
  • (in the plural) Pieces of this fabric, especially as used for the sleeves of a bishop.
  • (countable, obsolete) A piece of clothing made from lawn.
  • * 1910 , Margaret Hill McCarter, The Price of the Prairie :
  • References

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    Anagrams

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