Saveth vs Laveth - What's the difference?

saveth | laveth |


As verbs the difference between saveth and laveth

is that saveth is (save) while laveth is (archaic) (lave).

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

saveth

English

Verb

(head)
  • (save)
  • Anagrams

    *

    save

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • In various sports, a block that prevents an opponent from scoring.
  • The goaltender made a great save .
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2010 , date=December 29 , author=Sam Sheringham , title=Liverpool 0 - 1 Wolverhampton , work=BBC citation , page= , passage=Wolves defender Ronald Zubar was slightly closer with his shot on the turn as he forced Pepe Reina, on his 200th Premier League appearance, into a low save .}}
  • (baseball) When a relief pitcher comes into a game with a 3 run or less lead, and his team wins while continually being ahead.
  • Jones retired seven to earn the save .
  • (professional wrestling, slang) A point in a professional wrestling match when one or more wrestlers run to the ring to aid a fellow wrestler who is being beaten.
  • The giant wrestler continued to beat down his smaller opponent, until several wrestlers ran in for the save .
  • (computing) The act, process, or result of saving data to a storage medium.
  • If you're hit by a power cut, you'll lose all of your changes since your last save .
    The game console can store up to eight saves on a single cartridge.

    Verb

    (sav)
  • (label) To prevent harm or difficulty.
  • # To help (somebody) to survive, or rescue (somebody or something) from harm.
  • #*{{quote-magazine, date=2014-06-14, volume=411, issue=8891, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= It's a gas , passage=One of the hidden glories of Victorian engineering is proper drains. Isolating a city’s effluent and shipping it away in underground sewers has probably saved more lives than any medical procedure except vaccination.}}
  • # To keep (something) safe; to safeguard.
  • #* (John Milton) (1608-1674)
  • Thou hastquitted all to save / A world from utter loss.
  • # To spare (somebody) from effort, or from something undesirable.
  • #* (William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • I'll save you / That labour, sir. All's now done.
  • # (label) To redeem or protect someone from eternal damnation.
  • # (label) To catch or deflect (a shot at goal).
  • #* 2012 , Chelsea 6-0 Wolves
  • Chelsea's youngsters, who looked lively throughout, then combined for the second goal in the seventh minute. Romeu's shot was saved by Wolves goalkeeper Dorus De Vries but Piazon kept the ball alive and turned it back for an unmarked Bertrand to blast home.
  • To put aside, to avoid.
  • # (label) To store for future use.
  • # (label) To conserve or prevent the wasting of.
  • #*
  • #*:An indulgent playmate, Grannie would lay aside the long scratchy-looking letter she was writing (heavily crossed ‘to save notepaper’) and enter into the delightful pastime of ‘a chicken from Mr Whiteley's’.
  • # (label) To obviate or make unnecessary.
  • #* (John Dryden) (1631-1700)
  • Will you not speak to save a lady's blush?
  • # To write a file to disk or other storage medium.
  • # (label) To economize or avoid waste.
  • # To accumulate money or valuables.
  • Usage notes

    In computing sense “to write a file”, also used as phrasal verb (save down) informally. Compare other computing phrasal verbs such as (print out) and (close out).

    Derived terms

    * save as * saved by the bell * saved game, savegame * save file, savefile * save point, savepoint * save slot * save state * save the day * to save one's life

    Preposition

    (English prepositions)
  • Except; with the exception of.
  • :
  • *
  • *:Turning back, then, toward the basement staircase, she began to grope her way through blinding darkness, but had taken only a few uncertain steps when, of a sudden, she stopped short and for a little stood like a stricken thing, quite motionless save that she quaked to her very marrow in the grasp of a great and enervating fear.
  • Synonyms

    * (with the exception of) except

    Conjunction

    (English Conjunctions)
  • (dated) unless; except
  • Derived terms

    * * save as

    Statistics

    *

    Anagrams

    * 1000 English basic words ----

    laveth

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (archaic) (lave)

  • lave

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) .

    Verb

    (lav)
  • (obsolete) To pour or throw out, as water; lade out; bail; bail out.
  • (Dryden)
  • To draw, as water; drink in.
  • To give bountifully; lavish.
  • To run down or gutter, as a candle.
  • (dialectal) To hang or flap down.
  • (ambitransitive, archaic) To wash.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • In her chaste current oft the goddess laves .
  • * 1789 , William Lisle Bowles, 'Sonnet I' from Fourteen Sonnets , 1789.
  • the tranquil tide, / That laves the pebbled shore.
  • * 2006 , Cormac McCarthy, The Road , London: Picador, 2007, p. 38.
  • The boy walked out and squatted and laved up the dark water.

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) . More at (l).

    Noun

    (-)
  • (archaic or dialectal) The remainder, rest; that which is left, remnant; others.
  • * 1885 , Sir Richard Burton, The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night , Night 12.
  • Then they set upon us and slew some of my slaves and put the lave to flight.
  • * 1896 (posthumously), Robert Louis Stevenson, Songs of Travel and other verses .[https://archive.org/details/songsoftraveloth00stevrich]
  • Give to me the life I love,/Let the lave go by me...

    Anagrams

    * * * * * *

    References

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