Boring vs Lathe - What's the difference?

boring | lathe |


As nouns the difference between boring and lathe

is that boring is a pit or hole which has been d while lathe is (obsolete) an administrative division of the county of kent, in england, from the anglo-saxon period until it fell entirely out of use in the early twentieth century or lathe can be a machine tool used to shape a piece of material, or workpiece, by rotating the workpiece against a cutting tool.

As verbs the difference between boring and lathe

is that boring is while lathe is to invite; bid; ask or lathe can be to shape with a lathe.

As an adjective boring

is causing boredom.

boring

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • A pit or hole which has been d.
  • * 1992 , J. Patrick Powers, Construction dewatering: new methods and applications , p. 191:
  • It is common in urban areas that a great many borings exist from prior construction work.
  • Fragments thrown up when something is bored or drilled.
  • Verb

    (head)
  • Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • Causing boredom.
  • What a boring film that was!

    Synonyms

    * dull, mind-numbing (colloquial), tedious * See also

    Derived terms

    * *

    Anagrams

    * * ----

    lathe

    English

    (wikipedia lathe)

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) lathen, from (etyl) .

    Alternative forms

    * (l)

    Verb

  • To invite; bid; ask.
  • Etymology 2

    From (etyl) *.

    Alternative forms

    * (l)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) An administrative division of the county of Kent, in England, from the Anglo-Saxon period until it fell entirely out of use in the early twentieth century.
  • Etymology 3

    (etyl) . More at lade.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A machine tool used to shape a piece of material, or workpiece, by rotating the workpiece against a cutting tool.
  • He shaped the bedpost by turning it on a lathe .
  • * 1856 : (Gustave Flaubert), (Madame Bovary), Part II Chapter IV, translated by Eleanor Marx-Aveling
  • Of the windows of the village there was one yet more often occupied; for on Sundays from morning to night, and every morning when the weather was bright, one could see at the dormer-window of the garret the profile of Monsieur Binet bending over his lathe , whose monotonous humming could be heard at the Lion d'Or.
  • The movable swing frame of a loom, carrying the reed for separating the warp threads and beating up the weft; a lay, or batten.
  • (obsolete) A granary; a barn.
  • (Chaucer)

    Verb

    (lath)
  • To shape with a lathe.
  • (computer graphics) To produce a 3D model by rotating a set of points around a fixed axis.
  • See also

    * lath * turner

    Anagrams

    *