Laser vs Lases - What's the difference?

laser | lases |


As a noun laser

is .

As a verb lases is

.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

laser

English

Etymology 1

From LASER, Originally called an optical maser .

Noun

(wikipedia laser) (en noun)
  • A device that produces a monochromatic, coherent beam of light.
  • A laser printer.
  • * 2004 , PC Mag (volume 23, number 9, 18 May 2004, page 117)
  • The bad news is that nearly every color laser is too big to share a desk with comfortably.
    Synonyms
    * LASER ( acronym of light amplification by the stimulated emission of radiation ) * optical maser , optical MASER
    See also
    * Taser

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To cut with a
  • (sports) To throw with laser-like precision
  • * {{quote-news, year=2009, date=February 2, author=Dave Perkins, title=Steelers tiptoe past Cards, work=Toronto Star citation
  • , passage=None was any more sensational than No.6, a fantastic 27-23 last-gasp win over the Arizona Cardinals, cemented by a brilliant toe-sticking TD catch by Santonio Holmes in the back of the end zone with 35 seconds remaining on a pass lasered by quarterback Ben Roethlisberger. }}

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl)

    Alternative forms

    * lasar

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A gum resin obtained from certain umbelliferous plants.
  • Such a plant.
  • See also
    * silphium, silfium, silphion

    lases

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (lase)
  • Anagrams

    * *

    lase

    English

    Verb

    (las)
  • To use a laser beam on, as for cutting.
  • The surgeon lased the elongated soft palate, cutting off the excess tissue and stopping the blood flow in one swipe.
    The physical chemist lased the atoms as they passed between the electrodes to study their motion.
  • * 2010 (publication date), Daniel Lametti, "The Proton Gets Small(er)", , ISSN 0274-7529, volume 32, number 1, January–February 2011, page 67:
  • When a laser zaps an electron orbiting a proton, the electron undergoes what is called the Lamb shift, absorbing energy and jumping to a higher energy level. But instead of lasing electrons, Knowles examined protons with particles called muons, which he calls "the electon's fat cousin."
  • To operate as a laser, to release coherent light due to stimulation.
  • Anagrams

    * ----