Work vs Language - What's the difference?

work | language |


As nouns the difference between work and language

is that work is employment while language is (lb) a body of words, and set of methods of combining them (called a grammar), understood by a community and used as a form of communication or language can be a languet, a flat plate in or below the flue pipe of an organ.

As verbs the difference between work and language

is that work is to do a specific task by employing physical or mental powers while language is to communicate by language; to express in language.

work

English

(wikipedia work)

Etymology 1

From (etyl) (m), (m), from (etyl) worc, weorc, . English cognates include bulwark, energy, erg, georgic, liturgy, metallurgy, organ, surgeon, wright.

Noun

  • Employment.
  • #Labour, occupation, job.
  • #:
  • #*(William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • #*:Come on, Nerissa; I have work in hand / That you yet know not of.
  • #*Bible, 2 (w) xxxi. 21
  • #*:In every work that he beganhe did it with all his heart, and prospered.
  • #*, chapter=15
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=Edward Churchill still attended to his work in a hopeless mechanical manner like a sleep-walker who walks safely on a well-known round. But his Roman collar galled him, his cossack stifled him, his biretta was as uncomfortable as a merry-andrew's cap and bells.}}
  • #The place where one is employed.
  • #:
  • Effort.
  • #Effort expended on a particular task.
  • #:
  • ##Sustained human effort to overcome obstacles and achieve a result.
  • ##:
  • #(lb) A measure of energy expended in moving an object; most commonly, force times distance. No work is done if the object does not move.
  • #:
  • #*{{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=July-August, author= Lee S. Langston, magazine=(American Scientist)
  • , title= The Adaptable Gas Turbine , passage=Turbines have been around for a long time—windmills and water wheels are early examples. The name comes from the Latin turbo , meaning "vortex", and thus the defining property of a turbine is that a fluid or gas turns the blades of a rotor, which is attached to a shaft that can perform useful work .}}
  • #(lb) A nonthermal First Law energy in transit between one form or repository and another. Also, a means of accomplishing such transit. See http://arxiv.org/pdf/physics/0004055.
  • Sustained effort to achieve a goal or result, especially overcoming obstacles.
  • :
  • *
  • *:The Bat—they called him the Bat. Like a bat he chose the night hours for his work of rapine; like a bat he struck and vanished, pouncingly, noiselessly; like a bat he never showed himself to the face of the day.
  • (lb) Product; the result of effort.
  • # The result of a particular manner of production.
  • #:
  • # Something produced using the specified material or tool.
  • #:
  • #(lb) A literary, artistic, or intellectual production.
  • #:
  • #:
  • #*(William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • #*:to leave no rubs or blotches in the work
  • #*(John Milton) (1608-1674)
  • #*:The work some praise, / And some the architect.
  • #*
  • #*:“[…] We are engaged in a great work , a treatise on our river fortifications, perhaps? But since when did army officers afford the luxury of amanuenses in this simple republic?”
  • #(lb) A fortification.
  • #:
  • The staging of events to appear as real.
  • (lb) Ore before it is dressed.
  • :(Raymond)
  • Synonyms
    * (employment) See also * (productive activity) See also
    Derived terms
    * artwork * at work * body of work * bodywork * breastwork * bridgework * busy work * casework * clockwork * derivative work * dirty work * dreamwork * earthwork * field work, fieldwork * finger work * firework * fretwork * groundwork * guesswork * hard work * handiwork * homework * housework * ironwork * leg work, legwork * lifework * masterwork * needlework * openwork * overwork * paintwork * paperwork * patchwork * piece of work * piecework * public works * reference work * road work, roadwork * schoolwork * shift work, shiftwork * spadework * teamwork * waterworks * waxwork * wickerwork * woodwork * work ethic * work of art * worklist * workly * workout * workplace * workroom * workshop * workstation * workstead * workup

    See also

    * -ing

    References

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) .

    Verb

  • To do a specific task by employing physical or mental powers.
  • # Followed by in'' (or ''at , etc.) Said of one's workplace (building), or one's department, or one's trade (sphere of business).
  • I work''' in a national park;  she '''works''' in the human resources department;  he mostly '''works in logging, but sometimes works in carpentry
  • # Followed by as . Said of one's job title
  • #* , chapter=17
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=This time was most dreadful for Lilian. Thrown on her own resources and almost penniless, she maintained herself and paid the rent of a wretched room near the hospital by working as a charwoman, sempstress, anything.}}
  • I work as a cleaner.
  • # Followed by for . Said of a company or individual who employs.
  • she works''' for Microsoft;  he '''works for the president
  • # Followed by with . General use, said of either fellow employees or instruments or clients.
  • I work''' closely with my Canadian counterparts;  you '''work''' with computers;  she '''works with the homeless people from the suburbs
  • To effect by gradual degrees.
  • he worked''' his way through the crowd;  the dye '''worked''' its way through;  using some tweezers, she '''worked the bee sting out of her hand
  • * Addison
  • So the pure, limpid stream, when foul with stains / Of rushing torrents and descending rains, / Works itself clear, and as it runs, refines, / Till by degrees the floating mirror shines.
  • To embroider with thread.
  • To set into action.
  • To cause to ferment.
  • To ferment.
  • * Francis Bacon
  • the working of beer when the barm is put in
  • To exhaust, by working.
  • To shape, form, or improve a material.
  • To operate in a certain place, area, or speciality.
  • To operate in or through; as, to work the phones.
  • To provoke or excite; to influence.
  • To use or manipulate to one’s advantage.
  • To cause to happen or to occur as a consequence.
  • To cause to work.
  • To function correctly; to act as intended; to achieve the goal designed for.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-21, author=(Oliver Burkeman)
  • , volume=189, issue=2, page=48, magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , title= The tao of tech , passage=The dirty secret of the internet is that all this distraction and interruption is immensely profitable. Web companies like to boast about
  • (figuratively) To influence.
  • To effect by gradual degrees; as, to work into the earth.
  • To move in an agitated manner.
  • A ship works in a heavy sea.
  • * Addison
  • confused with working sands and rolling waves
  • To behave in a certain way when handled;
  • (transitive, with two objects, poetic) To cause (someone) to feel (something).
  • * {{quote-book, passage=So sad it seemed, and its cheek-bones gleamed, and its fingers flicked the shore; / And it lapped and lay in a weary way, and its hands met to implore; / That I gently said: “Poor, restless dead, I would never work you woe; / Though the wrong you rue you can ne’er undo, I forgave you long ago.”
  • , author=Robert W. Service , title=(Ballads of a Cheechako), chapter=(The Ballad of One-Eyed Mike), year=1909}}
  • (obsolete) To hurt; to ache.
  • * 1485 , Sir (Thomas Malory), ''(w, Le Morte d'Arthur), Book XXI:
  • ‘I wolde hit were so,’ seyde the Kynge, ‘but I may nat stonde, my hede worchys so—’
    Derived terms
    * work at * work off * work on * work out * work over * work up * rework * worker * working * work it * work like a beaver * work like a charm * work like a dog * work like a horse * work like a Trojan * work the crowd * work the room * work to rule * work wonders

    language

    English

    Etymology 1

    (etyl) language, from (etyl) language, from .

    Noun

    {{examples-right, The English Wiktionary uses the English language' to define words from all of the world's ' languages .


    This person is saying "hello" in American sign language . }} (wikipedia language)
  • (lb) A body of words, and set of methods of combining them (called a grammar), understood by a community and used as a form of communication.
  • * 1867', ''Report on the Systems of Deaf-Mute Instruction pursued in Europe'', quoted in '''1983 in ''History of the College for the Deaf, 1857-1907 (ISBN 0913580856), page 240:
  • Hence the natural language' of the mute is, in schools of this class, suppressed as soon and as far as possible, and its existence as a ' language , capable of being made the reliable and precise vehicle for the widest range of thought, is ignored.
  • * {{quote-book, page=50, year=1900, author=(w)
  • , title= The History of the Caliph Vathek , passage=No language could express his rage and despair.}}
  • * 2000 , Geary Hobson, The Last of the Ofos (ISBN 0816519595), page 113:
  • Mr. Darko, generally acknowledged to be the last surviving member of the Ofo Tribe, was also the last remaining speaker of the tribe's language .
  • (lb) The ability to communicate using words.
  • (lb) The vocabulary and usage of a particular specialist field.
  • *
  • Thus, when he drew up instructions in lawyer language , he expressed the important words by an initial, a medial, or a final consonant, and made scratches for all the words between; his clerks, however, understood him very well.
  • The expression of thought (the communication of meaning) in a specified way.
  • * 2001 , Eugene C. Kennedy, ?Sara C. Charles, On Becoming a Counselor (ISBN 0824519132):
  • A tale about themselves [is] told by people with help from the universal languages of their eyes, their hands, and even their shirting feet.
  • A body of sounds, signs and signals by which animals communicate, and by which plants are sometimes also thought to communicate.
  • A computer language; a machine language.
  • * 2015 , Kent D. Lee, Foundations of Programming Languages (ISBN 3319133144), page 94:
  • In fact pointers are called references in these languages' to distinguish them from pointers in ' languages like C and C++.
  • (lb) Manner of expression.
  • * (rfdate) Cowper:
  • Their language simple, as their manners meek,
  • (lb) The particular words used in a speech or a passage of text.
  • (lb) Profanity.
  • *{{quote-book, page=500, year=1978, author=James Carroll
  • , title= Mortal Friends, isbn=0440157897 , passage="Where the hell is Horace?" ¶ "There he is. He's coming. You shouldn't use language ."}}
    Synonyms
    * (form of communication) tongue, speech (spoken language) * (vocabulary of a particular field) lingo (colloquial), jargon, terminology, phraseology, parlance * (computer language) computer language, programming language, machine language * (particular words used) phrasing, wording, terminology
    Derived terms
    * artificial language * auxiliary language * bad language * body language * computing language * constructed language * endangered language * extinct language * foreign language * formal language * foul language * international language * language barrier * language code * language cop * language death * language extinction * language family * language lab, language laboratory * language model * language of flowers * language planning * language police * language pollution * language processing * language school * language shift * language technology * language transfer * languaging * machine language * mathematical language * mind one's language * natural language * pattern language * programming language * private language * secular language * sign language * speak someone's language * standard language * vehicular language * vernacular language

    Verb

  • To communicate by language; to express in language.
  • * (rfdate) Fuller:
  • Others were languaged in such doubtful expressions that they have a double sense.

    See also

    * lexis, term, word * bilingual * linguistics * multilingual * trilingual

    Etymology 2

    Alteration of (m).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A languet, a flat plate in or below the flue pipe of an organ.
  • * 1896 , William Horatio Clarke, The Organist's Retrospect , page 79:
  • A flue-pipe is one in which the air passes through the throat, or flue, which is the narrow, longitudinal aperture between the lower lip and the tongue, or language'.

    Statistics

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