Brain vs Language - What's the difference?

brain | language |


As nouns the difference between brain and language

is that brain is the control center of the central nervous system of an animal located in the skull which is responsible for perception, cognition, attention, memory, emotion, and action while language is (lb) a body of words, and set of methods of combining them (called a grammar), understood by a community and used as a form of communication or language can be a languet, a flat plate in or below the flue pipe of an organ.

As verbs the difference between brain and language

is that brain is to dash out the brains of; to kill by smashing the skull while language is to communicate by language; to express in language.

brain

English

Noun

(wikipedia brain) (en noun)
  • The control center of the central nervous system of an animal located in the skull which is responsible for perception, cognition, attention, memory, emotion, and action.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-07-19, author= Ian Sample
  • , volume=189, issue=6, page=34, magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , title= Irregular bedtimes may affect children's brains , passage=Irregular bedtimes may disrupt healthy brain development in young children, according to a study of intelligence and sleeping habits.  ¶ Going to bed at a different time each night affected girls more than boys, but both fared worse on mental tasks than children who had a set bedtime, researchers found.}}
  • (informal) An intelligent person.
  • (UK, plurale tantum) A person who provides the intelligence required for something.
  • (in the plural) Intellect.
  • * 2008 Quaker Action (magazine) Rights trampled in rush to deport immigrant workers , Fall 2008, Vol. 89, No. 3, p. 8:
  • "We provided a lot of brains and a lot of heart to the response when it was needed," says Sandra Sanchez, director of AFSC's Immigrants' Voice Program in Des Moines.
  • By analogy with a human brain, the part of a machine or computer that performs calculations.
  • oral sex
  • * 2012 , (Mack Maine) featuring Turk and Mystikal, I'm On It
  • *:You said I got brain from your dame in the range
  • *:In the passing lane
  • *:But you really ain't got no proof
  • Synonyms

    * * See also * See also

    Derived terms

    * beat someone's brains out * brainbox * brain bucket * brain candy * braincase * brain cell * brainchild * brain coral * brain cramp * brain damage * brain dead * brain death * brain disease * brain disorder * brain doctor * brain drain * brain fag * brain farm * brain fever * brain fingerprinting * brain food * brain freeze * brainiac * brainish * brainless * brain mushroom * brainpan * brainpower * brain science * brainsick * brain stem / brainstem * brainstorm * brain sugar * brain surgeon * brain surgery * brain-teaser * brain truster * brain tumor / brain tumour * brainwash * brainwave * brainworker * brainy * forebrain * left brain * microbrain * no-brainer * on the brain * organic brain syndrome * pick someone's brain * rack one's brain or rack one's brains * right brain * split brain * water on the brain * yellow brain fungus

    See also

    *

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To dash out the brains of; to kill by smashing the skull.
  • (slang) To strike (someone) on the head.
  • (figurative) To destroy; to put an end to.
  • * Shakespeare
  • There thou mayst brain him.
  • * Shakespeare
  • It was the swift celerity of the death That brained my purpose.
  • To conceive in the mind; to understand.
  • * Shakespeare
  • 'Tis still a dream, or else such stuff as madmen / Tongue, and brain not.

    Anagrams

    * (l) * (l) * (l), (l) * (l) ----

    language

    English

    Etymology 1

    (etyl) language, from (etyl) language, from .

    Noun

    {{examples-right, The English Wiktionary uses the English language' to define words from all of the world's ' languages .


    This person is saying "hello" in American sign language . }} (wikipedia language)
  • (lb) A body of words, and set of methods of combining them (called a grammar), understood by a community and used as a form of communication.
  • * 1867', ''Report on the Systems of Deaf-Mute Instruction pursued in Europe'', quoted in '''1983 in ''History of the College for the Deaf, 1857-1907 (ISBN 0913580856), page 240:
  • Hence the natural language' of the mute is, in schools of this class, suppressed as soon and as far as possible, and its existence as a ' language , capable of being made the reliable and precise vehicle for the widest range of thought, is ignored.
  • * {{quote-book, page=50, year=1900, author=(w)
  • , title= The History of the Caliph Vathek , passage=No language could express his rage and despair.}}
  • * 2000 , Geary Hobson, The Last of the Ofos (ISBN 0816519595), page 113:
  • Mr. Darko, generally acknowledged to be the last surviving member of the Ofo Tribe, was also the last remaining speaker of the tribe's language .
  • (lb) The ability to communicate using words.
  • (lb) The vocabulary and usage of a particular specialist field.
  • *
  • Thus, when he drew up instructions in lawyer language , he expressed the important words by an initial, a medial, or a final consonant, and made scratches for all the words between; his clerks, however, understood him very well.
  • The expression of thought (the communication of meaning) in a specified way.
  • * 2001 , Eugene C. Kennedy, ?Sara C. Charles, On Becoming a Counselor (ISBN 0824519132):
  • A tale about themselves [is] told by people with help from the universal languages of their eyes, their hands, and even their shirting feet.
  • A body of sounds, signs and signals by which animals communicate, and by which plants are sometimes also thought to communicate.
  • A computer language; a machine language.
  • * 2015 , Kent D. Lee, Foundations of Programming Languages (ISBN 3319133144), page 94:
  • In fact pointers are called references in these languages' to distinguish them from pointers in ' languages like C and C++.
  • (lb) Manner of expression.
  • * (rfdate) Cowper:
  • Their language simple, as their manners meek,
  • (lb) The particular words used in a speech or a passage of text.
  • (lb) Profanity.
  • *{{quote-book, page=500, year=1978, author=James Carroll
  • , title= Mortal Friends, isbn=0440157897 , passage="Where the hell is Horace?" ΒΆ "There he is. He's coming. You shouldn't use language ."}}
    Synonyms
    * (form of communication) tongue, speech (spoken language) * (vocabulary of a particular field) lingo (colloquial), jargon, terminology, phraseology, parlance * (computer language) computer language, programming language, machine language * (particular words used) phrasing, wording, terminology
    Derived terms
    * artificial language * auxiliary language * bad language * body language * computing language * constructed language * endangered language * extinct language * foreign language * formal language * foul language * international language * language barrier * language code * language cop * language death * language extinction * language family * language lab, language laboratory * language model * language of flowers * language planning * language police * language pollution * language processing * language school * language shift * language technology * language transfer * languaging * machine language * mathematical language * mind one's language * natural language * pattern language * programming language * private language * secular language * sign language * speak someone's language * standard language * vehicular language * vernacular language

    Verb

  • To communicate by language; to express in language.
  • * (rfdate) Fuller:
  • Others were languaged in such doubtful expressions that they have a double sense.

    See also

    * lexis, term, word * bilingual * linguistics * multilingual * trilingual

    Etymology 2

    Alteration of (m).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A languet, a flat plate in or below the flue pipe of an organ.
  • * 1896 , William Horatio Clarke, The Organist's Retrospect , page 79:
  • A flue-pipe is one in which the air passes through the throat, or flue, which is the narrow, longitudinal aperture between the lower lip and the tongue, or language'.

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