Whimper vs Lament - What's the difference?

whimper | lament | Related terms |

Whimper is a related term of lament.


As nouns the difference between whimper and lament

is that whimper is a low intermittent sob while lament is an expression of grief, suffering, or sadness.

As verbs the difference between whimper and lament

is that whimper is to cry or sob softly and intermittently while lament is to express grief; to weep or wail; to mourn.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

whimper

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • A low intermittent sob.
  • Verb

    (en verb)
  • To cry or sob softly and intermittently.
  • The lonely puppy began to whimper as soon as we left the room.
  • * 1886 , (Robert Louis Stevenson), (Strange Case Of Dr Jekyll And Mr Hyde)
  • At the sight of Mr. Utterson, the housemaid broke into hysterical whimpering ; and the cook, crying out "Bless God! it's Mr. Utterson," ran forward as if to take him in her arms.
  • To cry with a low, whining, broken voice; to whine; to complain.
  • * Latimer
  • Was there ever yet preacher but there were gainsayers that spurned, that winced, that whimpered against him?
  • To say something in a whimpering manner.
  • "Master, please don't punish me!" he whimpered .

    Synonyms

    * See also

    Derived terms

    * whimperative

    lament

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • An expression of grief, suffering, or sadness.
  • A song expressing grief.
  • Derived terms

    * (l) (rare)

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To express grief; to weep or wail; to mourn.
  • * Bible, John xvi. 20
  • Ye shall weep and lament , but the world shall rejoice.
  • To feel great sorrow or regret; to bewail.
  • * 2014 , , " Southampton hammer eight past hapless Sunderland in barmy encounter", The Guardian , 18 October 2014:
  • By the end, Sunderland were lucky to lose by the same scoreline Northampton Town suffered against Southampton, in 1921. The Sunderland manager, Gus Poyet, lamented that it was “the most embarrassed I’ve ever been on a football pitch, without a doubt”.
  • * Dryden
  • One laughed at follies, one lamented crimes.

    Synonyms

    * bewail

    Anagrams

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