Metaphor vs Lakoffian - What's the difference?

metaphor | lakoffian |


As a noun metaphor

is (uncountable|figure of speech) the use of a word or phrase to refer to something that it isn’t, invoking a direct similarity between the word or phrase used and the thing described, but in the case of english without the words like'' or ''as , which would imply a simile.

As an adjective lakoffian is

of or pertaining to (1941-), american cognitive linguist noted for his ideas about the centrality of metaphor to human thinking and behaviour.

metaphor

Noun

  • (uncountable, figure of speech) The use of a word or phrase to refer to something that it isn’t, invoking a direct similarity between the word or phrase used and the thing described, but in the case of English without the words like'' or ''as , which would imply a simile.
  • * What then is truth? A movable host of metaphors''', metonymies, and; anthropomorphisms: in short, a sum of human relations which have been poetically and rhetorically intensified, transferred, and embellished, and which, after long usage, seem to a people to be fixed, canonical, and binding. Truths are illusions which we have forgotten are illusions — they are '''metaphors that have become worn out and have been drained of sensuous force, coins which have lost their embossing and are now considered as metal and no longer as coins.'' — Friedrich Nietzsche, ''On Truth and Lies in a Nonmoral Sense , 1870, translated by Daniel Beazeale, 1979.
  • (countable, rhetoric) The word or phrase used in this way. An implied comparison.
  • Hypernyms

    * figure of speech

    Derived terms

    * dead metaphor * extended metaphor * malaphor * metaphorical * metaphorical extension * metaphoricity * metaphorism * stale metaphor

    See also

    * analogy * idiom * metonymy * simile

    lakoffian

    English

    Alternative forms

    *

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • Of or pertaining to (1941-), American cognitive linguist noted for his ideas about the centrality of metaphor to human thinking and behaviour.
  • English eponyms