Vulgar vs Lairy - What's the difference?

vulgar | lairy | Related terms |

Vulgar is a related term of lairy.


As adjectives the difference between vulgar and lairy

is that vulgar is vulgar while lairy is (uk) touchy, aggressive or confrontational, usually while drunk or lairy can be (australia) vulgar and flashy.

vulgar

English

Adjective

(en-adj)
  • Debased, uncouth, distasteful, obscene.
  • * {{quote-book
  • , year= 1551 , year_published= 1888 , author= , by= , title= A New English Dictionary on Historical Principles: Founded Mainly on the Materials Collected by the Philological Society. , url= http://books.google.com/books?id=JmpXAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA217 , original= , chapter= , section= Part 1 , isbn= , edition= , publisher= Clarendon Press , location= Oxford , editor= , volume= 1 , page= 217 , passage= Also the rule of false position, with dyuers examples not onely vulgar , but some appertaynyng to the rule of Algeber. }}
  • * The construction worker made a vulgar suggestion to the girls walking down the street.
  • (classical sense) Having to do with ordinary, common people.
  • * Bishop Fell
  • It might be more useful to the English reader to write in our vulgar language.
  • * Bancroft
  • The mechanical process of multiplying books had brought the New Testament in the vulgar tongue within the reach of every class.
  • * 1860 , G. Syffarth, "A Remarkable Seal in Dr. Abbott's Museum at New York", Transactions of the Academy of Science of St. Louis? , age 265
  • Further, the same sacred name in other monuments precedes the vulgar name of King Takellothis , the sixth of the XXII. Dyn., as we have seen.

    Synonyms

    * (obscene) inappropriate, obscene, debased, uncouth, offensive, ignoble, mean, profane * (ordinary) common, ordinary, popular

    Derived terms

    * (obscene) vulgarity * (ordinary) vulgar fraction, vulgate, Vulgate * vulgar fraction

    lairy

    English

    Etymology 1

    Adjective

    (er)
  • (UK) Touchy, aggressive or confrontational, usually while drunk.
  • Don't get lairy with me!
  • * 2001 . "rush to order". Simon Stuart, Glasgow Sunday Herald , 14 October.
  • *:"There's always been a weird duality at the heart of New Order: the fact that three druggy, lairy Mancs and the drummer's girlfriend can craft music of such awesome emotive power as to make grown neds weep."
  • * 2002 . “ ‘We wouldn?t dream of making you feel fat’”. Glasgow Herald , 27 July.
  • *:"Unskinny was a self-published riot of large lasses getting lairy in northern towns, and did a reasonable trade via friends and comic shops."
  • * 2002 . " Live With Chris Moyles". Gareth McLean, The Guardian , September 24.
  • *:"The show is lairy , loud and laddish; it does exactly what it says on the tin."
  • * 2005 . , Alexander Masters.
  • *:"I started to get a bit lairy , agitated on drink."
  • * 2005 . "Women do make the worst drunks. Maybe it's the sick'n'sequin mix...". , The Independent on Sunday , 20 November.
  • *:"Obviously, I'm not beginning to suggest women commit as much violent crime as men when plastered. But I do now concede that being aggressive, ignorant, lairy and foul-mouthed suits the ladies even less than it suits the fellas."
  • Etymology 2

    Thought to be from . Australian National Dictionary Centre » Australian words » Meanings and origins of Australian words and idioms » L

    Adjective

    (er)
  • (Australia) Vulgar and flashy.
  • * 1983 , National Book Council (Australia), Australian Book Review , Issues 48-57, page 29,
  • He was lairy alright, resplendent in a purple blazer and pink trousers.
  • * 2008 , Helen Garner, True Stories , page 255,
  • They had no wedding party, only an Australian couple in their sixties, the woman in a great deal of pancake and blusher and a lairy fur jacket.
  • * 2009 , Sally Neighbour, The Mother of Mohammed: An Australian Woman?s Extraordinary Journey Into Jihad , page 176,
  • Sungkar told Rabiah he thought of her as he rode to freedom on his motor scooter through the green wrought-iron gates, disguised in a pair of blue jeans and a lairy short-sleeved batik shirt: ‘Rabiah reckoned the safari suit was bad—if only she could see me now’.
  • (Australia) Socially unacceptable.
  • References

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