Riddled vs Laden - What's the difference?

riddled | laden |


As an adjective riddled

is damaged throughout by holes.

As a verb riddled

is (riddle).

As a noun laden is

.

riddled

English

Adjective

(en adjective)
  • Damaged throughout by holes.
  • Having (something) spread throughout, as if by an infestation.
  • #
  • The minister claimed that the old benefits system was riddled with abuse and fraud.
  • #
  • #* 2008 , Joan London, The Good Parents , Random House Australia, ISBN 978-1-74166-793-6, page 235:
  • They took a swig each from an old bottle of sherry and ate some stale digestive biscuits sealed in a tin in the mouse-riddled cupboards.
  • Verb

    (head)
  • (riddle)
  • Anagrams

    *

    laden

    English

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • Weighed down with a load, burdened.
  • * 1883 , (Robert Louis Stevenson), (Treasure Island)
  • The other men were variously burthened; some carrying picks and shovels—for that had been the very first necessary they brought ashore from the Hispaniola —others laden with pork, bread, and brandy for the midday meal.
  • Heavy.
  • Oppressed.
  • *
  • Thus the red damask curtains which now shut out the fog-laden , drizzling atmosphere of the Marylebone Road, had cost a mere song, and yet they might have been warranted to last another thirty years. A great bargain also had been the excellent Axminster carpet which covered the floor;.
  • (label) In the form of an adsorbate or adduct.
  • Verb

    (head)