Laked vs Laced - What's the difference?

laked | laced |


As verbs the difference between laked and laced

is that laked is (lake) while laced is (lace).

As an adjective laced is

tainted with something, especially a drug.

laked

English

Verb

(head)
  • (lake)
  • Anagrams

    *

    lake

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) . Despite their similarity in form and meaning, (etyl) lake is not related to (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A small stream of running water; a channel for water; a drain.
  • A large, landlocked stretch of water.
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=4 , passage=Judge Short had gone to town, and Farrar was off for a three days' cruise up the lake . I was bitterly regretting I had not gone with him when the distant notes of a coach horn reached my ear, and I descried a four-in-hand winding its way up the inn road from the direction of Mohair.}}
  • A large amount of liquid; as , a wine lake.
  • * 1991 , (Robert DeNiro) (actor), :
  • So you punched out a window for ventilation. Was that before'' or ''after you noticed you were standing in a lake of gasoline?
    Synonyms
    * See also
    Derived terms
    * ephemeral lake * Great Lakes * Lake District * Lakes * lakeness * oxbow lake
    See also
    * billabong * lagoon * pond * tarn
    References
    * {{reference-book , last = Kenneth , first = Sisam , title = Fourteenth Century Verse and Prose , origyear = 2009 , publisher = BiblioBazaar , id = ISBN 1110730802, 9781110730803 }} * {{reference-book , last = Astell , first = Ann W. , title = Political allegory in late medieval England , origyear = 1999 , publisher = Cornell University Press , id = ISBN 0801435609, 9780801435607 , pages = 192 }} * {{reference-book , last = Cameron , first = Kenneth , title = English Place Names , origyear = 1961 , publisher = B. T. Batsford Limited , id = SBN 416 27990 2 , pages = 164 }} * {{reference-book , last = Maetzner , first = Eduard Adolf Ferdinand , title = An English Grammar; Methodical, Analytical, and Historical , origyear = 2009 , publisher = BiblioBazaar, LLC , id = ISBN 1113149965, 9781113149961 , pages = 200 }} * {{reference-book , last = Rissanen , first = Matti , title = History of Englishes: new methods and interpretations in historical linguistics , origyear = 1992 , publisher = Walter de Gruyter , id = ISBN 3110132168, 9783110132168 , pages = 513-514 }} * {{reference-book , last = Ferguson , first = Robert , title = English surnames: and their place in the Teutonic family , origyear = 1858 , publisher = G. Routledge & co. , pages = 368 }}

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) lake, lak, lac (also loke, laik, layke), from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) An offering, sacrifice, gift.
  • (dialectal) Play; sport; game; fun; glee.
  • Derived terms
    * bridelock * wedlock

    Verb

    (lak)
  • (obsolete) To present an offering.
  • (chiefly, dialectal) To leap, jump, exert oneself, play.
  • Etymology 3

    From (etyl) lachen

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) Fine linen.
  • Etymology 4

    From (etyl) , referring to the number of insects that gather on the trees and make the resin seep out.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • In dyeing and painting, an often fugitive crimson or vermillion pigment derived from an organic colorant (cochineal or madder, for example) and an inorganic, generally metallic mordant.
  • Derived terms
    * lake-red

    Verb

    (lak)
  • To make lake-red.
  • Etymology 5

    Compare lek.

    Verb

    (lak)
  • (obsolete) To play; to sport.
  • Anagrams

    * kale * leak English terms with multiple etymologies ----

    laced

    English

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • Tainted with something, especially a drug.
  • I don't know what it was laced with, but he passed out a minute after drinking that first beer.

    Verb

    (head)
  • (lace)
  • Especially of shoelaces, intertwined and neatly knotted.
  • Are your shoes laced up yet?
    The handkercheif was laced up into a neat little pillow.

    Anagrams

    * * *