Sore vs Kore - What's the difference?

sore | kore |


As nouns the difference between sore and kore

is that sore is an injured, infected, inflamed or diseased patch of skin while kore is an Ancient Greek statue of a woman, portrayed standing, usually clothed, painted in bright colours and having an elaborate hairstyle.

As an adjective sore

is causing pain or discomfort; painfully sensitive.

As an adverb sore

is very, excessively, extremely (of something bad).

As a verb sore

is mutilate the legs or feet of (a horse) in order to induce a particular gait in the animal.

As a proper noun Kore is

the birth name of Persephone/Proserpina, the queen of the Underworld/Hades, and goddess of the seasons and of vegetation. She is the daughter of Zeus and Demeter; and the wife of Hades.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

sore

English

(wikipedia sore)

Adjective

(er)
  • Causing pain or discomfort; painfully sensitive.
  • Her feet were sore from walking so far.
  • Sensitive; tender; easily pained, grieved, or vexed; very susceptible of irritation.
  • * Tillotson
  • Malice and hatred are very fretting and vexatious, and apt to make our minds sore and uneasy.
  • Dire; distressing.
  • The school was in sore need of textbooks, theirs having been ruined in the flood.
  • (informal) Feeling animosity towards someone; annoyed or angered.
  • Joe was sore at Bob for beating him at checkers.
  • (obsolete) Criminal; wrong; evil.
  • (Shakespeare)

    Derived terms

    * sight for sore eyes * sorely * soreness * sore point

    Adverb

    (-)
  • (lb) Very, excessively, extremely (of something bad).
  • :
  • *
  • *:Orion hit a rabbit once; but though sore wounded it got to the bury, and, struggling in, the arrow caught the side of the hole and was drawn out. Indeed, a nail filed sharp is not of much avail as an arrowhead; you must have it barbed, and that was a little beyond our skill. Ikey the blacksmith had forged us a spearhead after a sketch from a picture of a Greek warrior; and a rake-handle served as a shaft.
  • Sorely.
  • *1919 , (Edgar Rice Burroughs), Jungle Tales of Tarzan
  • *:[… they] were often sore pressed to follow the trail at all, and at best were so delayed that in the afternoon of the second day, they still had not overhauled the fugitive.
  • Noun

    (en noun)
  • An injured, infected, inflamed or diseased patch of skin.
  • They put ointment and a bandage on the sore .
  • Grief; affliction; trouble; difficulty.
  • * Sir Walter Scott
  • I see plainly where his sore lies.
  • A group of ducks on land. (See also: sord).
  • A young hawk or falcon in its first year.
  • A young buck in its fourth year.
  • Verb

  • mutilate the legs or feet of (a horse) in order to induce a particular gait in the animal.
  • Derived terms

    * soring

    See also

    * blister * lesion * ulcer

    Anagrams

    * ----

    kore

    English

    Noun

    (en-noun)
  • (arts, sculpture) An Ancient Greek statue of a woman, portrayed standing, usually clothed, painted in bright colours and having an elaborate hairstyle.
  • * 1966 , Spyros Meletz?s, Helen? A. Papadak?, Akropolis and Museum , page 42,
  • Mus. No 685: Archaic kore' of island marble (500-490 B. C.) 4 ft high. Attic work. This '''kore''' is not wearing the Ionian smile, but a look of solemn gravity. She does not gather up her robes with the left hand like the other ' kores ,.
  • * 1995 , Irene Bald Romano, University of Pennsylvania Museum, The Terracotta Figurines and Related Vessels , page 14,
  • Ducat believes that all the kore plastic vessels wearing transverse himatia ending in stepped folds over the abdomen originate in Rhodes (1966: 72).
  • * 2002 , Matthew Dillon, Girls and Women in Classical Greek Religion , page 9,
  • Inscribed dedications often took the form of korai' (singular: ' kore ): statues, usually life-size or larger of female figures, generally goddesses.

    Coordinate terms

    * kouros (statue of a male)

    Anagrams

    * ----