Fore vs Kore - What's the difference?

fore | kore |


In lang=en terms the difference between fore and kore

is that fore is an exclamation yelled to inform players a ball is moving in their direction while kore is {{given name|female|from=Ancient Greek}}.

As an adjective fore

is former; occurring earlier (in some order); previous.

As an interjection fore

is an exclamation yelled to inform players a ball is moving in their direction.

As an adverb fore

is in the part that precedes or goes first; opposed to aft, after, back, behind, etc.

As a verb fore

is simple past of fare.

fore

English

Etymology 1

A development of the prefix .

Adjective

  • (obsolete) Former; occurring earlier (in some order); previous.
  • the fore part of the day
  • Forward; situated towards the front (of something).
  • the fore end of a wagon
  • * 1969 , Vladimir Nabokov, Ada or Ardor , Penguin 2011, p. 23:
  • Crystal vases with crimson roses and golden-brown asters were set here and there in the fore part of the shop [...].
    Antonyms
    * (order) latter * (location) aft

    Interjection

    (en interjection)
  • (golf) An exclamation yelled to inform players a ball is moving in their direction.
  • Noun

    (-)
  • The front; the forward part of something; the foreground.
  • The fore was painted white.
  • * 2002 , Mark Bevir, The Logic of the History of Ideas :
  • People face a dilemma whenever they bring to the fore an understanding that appears inadequate in the light of the other beliefs they bring to bear on it.

    Adverb

    (-)
  • In the part that precedes or goes first; opposed to aft, after, back, behind, etc.
  • (obsolete) Formerly; previously; afore.
  • * Shakespeare
  • The eyes, fore duteous, now converted are.
  • (nautical) In or towards the bows of a ship.
  • Etymology 2

    *

    Verb

    (head)
  • (fare)
  • kore

    English

    Noun

    (en-noun)
  • (arts, sculpture) An Ancient Greek statue of a woman, portrayed standing, usually clothed, painted in bright colours and having an elaborate hairstyle.
  • * 1966 , Spyros Meletz?s, Helen? A. Papadak?, Akropolis and Museum , page 42,
  • Mus. No 685: Archaic kore' of island marble (500-490 B. C.) 4 ft high. Attic work. This '''kore''' is not wearing the Ionian smile, but a look of solemn gravity. She does not gather up her robes with the left hand like the other ' kores ,.
  • * 1995 , Irene Bald Romano, University of Pennsylvania Museum, The Terracotta Figurines and Related Vessels , page 14,
  • Ducat believes that all the kore plastic vessels wearing transverse himatia ending in stepped folds over the abdomen originate in Rhodes (1966: 72).
  • * 2002 , Matthew Dillon, Girls and Women in Classical Greek Religion , page 9,
  • Inscribed dedications often took the form of korai' (singular: ' kore ): statues, usually life-size or larger of female figures, generally goddesses.

    Coordinate terms

    * kouros (statue of a male)

    Anagrams

    * ----