Nil vs Knee - What's the difference?

nil | knee |


As an initialism nil

is (nanotechnology) (nanoimprint lithography).

As a noun knee is

in humans, the joint or the region of the joint in the middle part of the leg between the thigh and the shank.

As a verb knee is

(archaic) to kneel to.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

nil

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • Nothing; zero.
  • * 1946 , (Bertrand Russell), History of Western Philosophy , I.19:
  • As to Aristotle's influence on him, we are left free to conjecture whatever seems to us most plausible. For my part, I should suppose it nil .

    Determiner

    (en determiner)
  • No, not any.
  • * 1982 , Gavin Lyall, Conduct of Major Maxim , Hodder & Stoughton Ltd:
  • But after two or three hours and nil results, you have to accept that the trail is cold and you can't justify that level of manpower.

    See also

    * null * nil desperandum

    knee

    English

    Noun

    (en-noun)
  • In humans, the joint or the region of the joint in the middle part of the leg between the thigh and the shank.
  • Penny was wearing a miniskirt, so she skinned her exposed knees when she fell.
  • In the horse and allied animals, the carpal joint, corresponding to the wrist in humans.
  • The part of a garment that covers the knee.
  • (shipbuilding) A piece of timber or metal formed with an angle somewhat in the shape of the human knee when bent.
  • * 1980 , Richard W. Unger, The Ship in the Medieval Economy 600-1600 , page 41
  • Deck beams were supported by hanging knees , triangular pieces of wood typically found underneath the timbers they are designed to support, but in this case found above them.
  • (archaic) An act of kneeling, especially to show respect or courtesy.
  • * circa'' 1605 , (William Shakepeare), ''(Timon of Athens) , Act III, scene iii, line 36
  • Give them title, knee , and approbation.
    To make a knee .
  • Any knee-shaped item or sharp angle in a line, "the knee of a graph", an inflection point.
  • A blow made with the knee; a kneeing.
  • Derived terms

    * down on one's knees * kneecap * kneejerk * kneel * kneepan * kneesies * knees-up

    Verb

    (d)
  • (archaic) To kneel to.
  • * 1605': I could as well be brought / To '''knee his throne and, squire-like, pension beg / To keep base life afoot. — William Shakespeare, ''King Lear II.ii
  • To poke or strike with the knee.