Kilonewton vs Kip - What's the difference?

kilonewton | kip |


1 kilonewton is 0.224808923655 kips


1 kip is 4.448222 kilonewtons


As nouns the difference between kilonewton and kip

is that kilonewton is one thousand newtons while kip is the untanned of a young or small beast, such as a calf, lamb, or young goat or kip can be (informal|chiefly uk) a place to sleep; a rooming house; a bed or kip can be a unit of force equal to 1000 pounds-force (lbf) (444822 kilonewtons or 444822 newtons); occasionally called the kilopound or kip can be the unit of currency in laos, divided into 100 att, symbol , abbreviation lak or kip can be (gymnastics) a basic skill or maneuver in used, for example, as a way of mounting the bar in a front support position, or achieving a handstand from a hanging position in its basic form, the legs are swung forward and upward by bending the hips, then suddenly down again, which gives the upward impulse to the body.

As a verb kip is

(informal|chiefly uk) to sleep; often with the connotation of a temporary or charitable situation, or one borne out of necessity.

kilonewton

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • One thousand newtons.
  • Synonyms

    * kN

    kip

    English

    Etymology 1

    1325–75, (etyl) kipp, from (etyl) kip, from (etyl)

    Alternative forms

    * kipp, kippe, kyppe

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The untanned of a young or small beast, such as a calf, lamb, or young goat.
  • A bundle or set of such hides.
  • (obsolete) A unit of count for skins, 30 for lamb and 50 for goat.
  • The leather made from such hide; kip leather .
  • Etymology 2

    1760–70, probably related to (etyl) . From the same distant Germanic root as (cove).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (informal, chiefly UK) A place to sleep; a rooming house; a bed.
  • (informal, chiefly UK) Sleep, snooze, nap, forty winks, doze.
  • I’m just going for my afternoon kip .
  • (informal, chiefly UK) A very untidy house or room.
  • (informal, chiefly UK, dated) A brothel.
  • Verb

    (kipp)
  • (informal, chiefly UK) To sleep; often with the connotation of a temporary or charitable situation, or one borne out of necessity.
  • Don’t worry, I’ll kip on the sofabed.
    Synonyms
    * crash (US)

    Etymology 3

    1910–15, Americanism, abbreviated from (kilo) + (pound).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A unit of force equal to 1000 pounds-force (lbf) (4.44822 kilonewtons or 4448.22 newtons); occasionally called the kilopound.
  • A unit of weight, used, for example, to calculate shipping charges, equal to half a US ton, or 1000 pounds.
  • (rare, nonstandard) A unit of mass equal to 1000 avoirdupois pounds.
  • Etymology 4

    1950–55, from (etyl) . (Lao kip)

    Noun

    (kip)
  • The unit of currency in Laos, divided into 100 att, symbol , abbreviation LAK.
  • (-)

    Etymology 5

    Unknown. Some senses maybe related to (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (gymnastics) A basic skill or maneuver in used, for example, as a way of mounting the bar in a front support position, or achieving a handstand from a hanging position. In its basic form, the legs are swung forward and upward by bending the hips, then suddenly down again, which gives the upward impulse to the body.
  • (Australia, games, two-up) A piece of flat wood used to throw the coins in a game of two-up.
  • * 1951 , , 1952, page 208,
  • Again Turk placed the pennies on the kip'. He took his time, deliberate over the small action, held the ' kip for a long breathless moment, then jerked his wrist and the pennies were in the air.
  • * 2003 , Gilbert Buchanan, Malco Polia - Traveller, Warrior , page 52,
  • Money was laid on the floor for bets on the heads'' or ''tails'' finish of two pennies tossed high into the air from a small wooden ''kip .
  • * 2010 , Colin McLaren, Sunflower: A Tale of Love, War and Intrigue , page 101,
  • Jack discarded a length of wood, two twists of wire, his two-up kip and a spanner.
  • A sharp-pointed hill; a projecting point, as on a hill.
  • Derived terms
    * kip-up

    Anagrams

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