Pet vs Kid - What's the difference?

pet | kid |


As an acronym pet

is (organic compound) polyethylene terephthalate.

As a noun kid is

a young goat or kid can be a fagot; a bundle of heath and furze.

As a verb kid is

(colloquial) to make a fool of (someone).

pet

English

Etymology 1

Attested since the 1500s in the sense "indulged child" and since the 1530s in the sense "animal companion"..'>citation The verb is derived from the noun.

Noun

(wikipedia pet) {{ picdic , image=Pudel miniatura 342.jpg , detail1= }} (en noun)
  • An animal kept as a companion.
  • One who is excessively loyal to a superior.
  • Any person or animal especially cherished and indulged; a darling.
  • * Tatler
  • the love of cronies, pets , and favourites
    Synonyms
    * companion animal

    References

    Verb

    (pett)
  • To stroke or fondle (an animal).
  • (informal) To stroke or fondle (another person) amorously.
  • (informal) Of two or more people, to stroke and fondle one another amorously.
  • (dated) To treat as a pet; to fondle; to indulge.
  • His daughter was petted and spoiled.
  • (archaic) To be a pet.
  • (Feltham)
    Derived terms
    * pet cemetery * pet name * pet peeve * pet project * pet shop * pet store * petting * teacher's pet

    Adjective

    (-)
  • Favourite; cherished.
  • a pet child
    a pet theory
  • * F. Harrison
  • Some young lady's pet curate.

    Etymology 2

    .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A fit of petulance, a sulk, arising from the impression that one has been offended or slighted.
  • * 1891 , Mary Noailles Murfree, In the "Stranger People's" Country , Nebraska 2005, p. 105:
  • There was something ludicrous, even more, unbecoming a gentleman, in leaving a friend's house in a pet , with the host's reproaches sounding in his ears, to be matched only by the bitterness of the guest's sneering retorts.

    Etymology 3

    .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Etymology 4

    .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (Geordie) A term of endearment usually applied to women and children.
  • References

    *

    Anagrams

    * ----

    kid

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) kide, from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A young goat.
  • * 1719 , (Daniel Defoe), ,
  • I went, indeed, intending to kill a kid' out of my own flock; and bring it home and dress it; but as I was going I saw a she-goat lying down in the shade, and two young ' kids sitting by her.
  • Of a goat, the state of being pregnant: in kid .
  • Kidskin.
  • * 1912 , (Jean Webster), ,
  • I have three pairs of kid' gloves. I've had '''kid''' mittens before from the Christmas tree, but never real ' kid gloves with five fingers.
  • (uncountable) The meat of a young goat.
  • * 1819 , (Walter Scott), , Chapter 5,
  • So saying, he gathered together, and brought to a flame, the decaying brands which lay scattered on the ample hearth; took from the larger board a mess of pottage and seethed kid , placed it upon the small table at which he had himself supped, and, without waiting the Jew's thanks, went to the other side of the hall; .
  • A young antelope.
  • (colloquial) A child or young person.
  • * {{quote-book, year=1963, author=(Margery Allingham), title=(The China Governess)
  • , chapter=15 citation , passage=‘No,’ said Luke, grinning at her. ‘You're not dull enough! […] What about the kid' s clothes? I don't suppose they were anything to write home about, but didn't you keep anything? A bootee or a bit of embroidery or anything at all?’}}
  • * 2007 July 5, (Barack Obama), ,
  • Our kids' are why all of you are in this room today. Our '''kids''' are why you wake up wondering how you'll make a difference and go to bed thinking about tomorrow's lesson plan. Our ' kids are why you walk into that classroom every day even when you're not getting the support, or the pay, or the respect that you deserve - because you believe that every child should have a chance to succeed; that every child can be taught.
  • (colloquial) An inexperienced person or one in a junior position.
  • * 2007 June 3, (Eben Moglen), speech, ,
  • I remember as a kid lawyer working at IBM in the summer of 1983, when a large insurance company in Hartford, Connecticut, for the first time asked to buy 12000 IBM PCs in a single order.
  • (nautical) A small wooden mess tub in which sailors received their food.
  • (Cooper)
    Synonyms
    * (kidskin) kid leather * (meat of a young goat) cabrito * see also
    Derived terms
    * handle with kid gloves * kiddy * kidly * kidskin * kidult * quiz kid * whiz kid

    Verb

    (kidd)
  • (colloquial) To make a fool of (someone).
  • (colloquial) To make a joke with (someone).
  • Of a goat, to give birth to kids.
  • (colloquial) To joke.
  • You're kidding !
    Only kidding

    See also

    * suede

    Etymology 2

    Compare (etyl) cidysen.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A fagot; a bundle of heath and furze.
  • (Wright)

    Anagrams

    * ----