Tetch vs Ketch - What's the difference?

tetch | ketch |


As verbs the difference between tetch and ketch

is that tetch is (regional) while ketch is or ketch can be (rare) to hang.

As nouns the difference between tetch and ketch

is that tetch is while ketch is a fore and aft rigged sailing vessel with two masts, main and mizzen, the mizzen being stepped forward of the rudder post or ketch can be a hangman.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

tetch

English

Verb

(es)
  • (regional)
  • * {{quote-book, year=1877, author=Samuel Woodworth Cozzens, title=The Young Trail Hunters, chapter=, edition= citation
  • , passage="Wal, I sot there, eatin' away, and, the fust thing I knowed, I kind 'er felt suthin' tetch my shoulder. }}
  • * {{quote-book, year=1880, author=Mark Twain (Samuel Clemens), title=Roughing It, chapter=, edition= citation
  • , passage=The minute we'd tetch off a blast 'n' the fuse'd begin to sizzle, he'd give a look as much as to say: 'Well, I'll have to git you to excuse me,' an' it was surpris'n' the way he'd shin out of that hole 'n' go f'r a tree. }}
  • * {{quote-book, year=1919, author=O. Henry, title=Roads of Destiny, chapter=, edition= citation
  • , passage="Miss Lucy tetch you on de shoulder," continued the old man, never heeding, "wid a s'ord, and say: 'I mek you a knight, Suh Robert--rise up, pure and fearless and widout reproach.' }}

    Noun

    (es)
  • * {{quote-news, year=2001, date=November 2, author=Monica Kendrick, title=Spot Check, work=Chicago Reader citation
  • , passage=The three songs I've heard so far are low-key and restrained, with a tetch of honky-tonk tension--the sound of a heart being bounced up and down like a squishy yo-yo. }}

    ketch

    English

    Etymology 1

    (en)

    Noun

    (es)
  • A fore and aft rigged sailing vessel with two masts, main and mizzen, the mizzen being stepped forward of the rudder post.
  • See also
    * yawl.

    Etymology 2

    See catch

    Verb

    (es)
  • .
  • * 1815 , D. HUMPHREYS, Yankey in England , I. 21,
  • I guess, he is trying to ketch' mebut it won't du. I'm tu old a bird to be ' ketch'd with chaff.
  • * 1865 , , II. IV. xv., page 287
  • Wot is it, lambs, as they ketches in seas, rivers, lakes, and ponds?
  • * 1883 [see KNUCK 2].
  • * 1911 , , volume ii, page 60
  • You'll ketch your death. The fire's out long ago.
  • * 1916 , W. O. BRADLEY, Stories & Speeches 18
  • You'll never ketch me hollerin' at no Republican gatherin'.
  • * 1929 , H. W. ODUM, in A. Dundes Mother Wit (1973), page 184
  • If so you gonna ketch hell.
  • * 1967 , Atlantic Monthly , Apr. 103/1
  • You heard about that joke a dollar down and a dollar when you ketch me?
  • * 1968 S. STUCKEY, in A. Chapman, New Black Voices (1972), page 445
  • Etymology 3

    From Jack Ketch, a hangman of the 17th century.

    Verb

    (es)
  • (rare) To hang.
  • * 1681 , T. FLATMAN Heraclitus Ridens No. 14
  • 'Squire Ketch rejoices as much to hear of a new Vox, as an old Sexton does to hear of a new Delight.
  • * n.d. , ''Ibid;;. No. 18
  • Well! If he has a mind to be Ketch'd , speed him say I.
  • * 1840', ' Fraser's Mag ., XXI. 210
  • Ignorant of many of the secrets of ketchcraft .
  • * 1859 , MATSELL Vocab. s.v. (Farmer),
  • I'll ketch you; I'll hang you.

    Noun

    (es)
  • A hangman.