Pointed vs Keen - What's the difference?

pointed | keen | Related terms |

Pointed is a related term of keen.


As verbs the difference between pointed and keen

is that pointed is (point) while keen is (rare) to sharpen; to make cold or keen can be to utter a keen.

As adjectives the difference between pointed and keen

is that pointed is (comparable) sharp, barbed; not dull while keen is showing a quick and ardent willingness or responsiveness, enthusiastic, eager; interested, intense.

As a noun keen is

a prolonged wail for a deceased person.

pointed

English

Verb

(head)
  • (point)
  • Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • (comparable) Sharp, barbed; not dull.
  • The warrior brandished a pointed spear.
  • (not comparable) In animals, having a coat pattern with points, that is, darkening of the extremities.
  • The Siamese is a pointed breed of cat.
  • (comparable, of a comment or inference) Directed negatively at a person or topic.
  • * 1863 February 21, “ Important from Washington”, in The New York Times :
  • Attention has been called to the report in a New-York paper, which has been made the subject of pointed comment
  • * 2013 June 18, , " Protests Widen as Brazilians Chide Leaders," New York Times (retrieved 21 June 2013):
  • After a harsh police crackdown last week fueled anger and swelled protests, President Dilma Rousseff, a former guerrilla who was imprisoned under the dictatorship and has now become the target of pointed criticism herself, tried to appease dissenters by embracing their cause on Tuesday.
  • * 1910 September 3, “ Taft Is Not Pleased by Roosevelt Plan”, in The New York Times :
  • President Taft to-day had a pointed comment for the "new nationalism" that his predecessor has been launching in the West.

    Synonyms

    * (sharp) pointy, sharp

    Antonyms

    * (sharp) blunt

    Derived terms

    * pointedly

    Anagrams

    *

    keen

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) . More at (l), (l).

    Alternative forms

    * keene, kene (archaic)

    Adjective

    (er)
  • showing a quick and ardent willingness or responsiveness, enthusiastic, eager; interested, intense.
  • vehement; fierce; as, a keen appetite.
  • * (rfdate),
  • Of full keen will.
  • * (rfdate), Shakespeare
  • So keen and greedy to confound a man.
  • sharp; having a fine edge or point.
  • * (rfdate) :
  • That my keen knife see not the wound it makes.
  • acute of mind; sharp; penetrating; having or expressing mental acuteness.
  • * (rfdate),
  • To make our wits more keen .
  • * (rfdate),
  • Before the keen inquiry of her thought.
  • bitter; piercing; acrimonious; cutting; stinging; severe; as, keen satire or sarcasm.
  • * (rfdate)
  • Good father cardinal, cry thou amen to my keen curses.
  • piercing; penetrating; cutting; sharp; -- applied to cold, wind, etc,; as, a keen wind; the cold is very keen.
  • * (rfdate),
  • Breasts the keen air, and carols as he goes.
  • Enthusiastic
  • I'm keen to learn another language.
    I'm keen on learning another language.
    I'm keen on languages.
    I'm keen about learning languages.
    I'm keen for help.
    ''"Do you want to learn another language?" / "I'm keen ."
  • (US, informal, dated) Marvelous.
  • I just got this peachy keen new dress.
  • (UK) extremely low as to be competitive.
  • keen prices
  • (obsolete) brave, courageous; bold, audacious.
  • Usage notes
    * Keen is often used in the composition of words, most of which are of obvious signification; as, keen-edged, keen-eyed, keen-sighted, keen-witted, etc.
    Synonyms
    * prompt; eager; ardent; sharp; acute; cutting; penetrating; biting; severe; sarcastic; satirical; piercing; shrewd. * See also
    Derived terms
    * keen-witted * keen as mustard * keen on * keenly * keenness

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (rare) To sharpen; to make cold.
  • * (rfdate), Thomson.
  • Cold winter keens the brightening flood.

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A prolonged wail for a deceased person.
  • * '>citation
  • Verb

    (en verb)
  • To utter a keen.
  • * (rfdate) Stuart Howard-Jones (1904-1974), Hibernia.'' Collected in ''The New Oxford Book of English Light Verse, 1978.
  • Keen —meaning 'brisk'? Nay, here the Language warps:
    'Tis singing bawdy Ballads to a Corpse.
  • To utter with a loud wailing voice or wordless cry.
  • *
  • To mourn.
  • *
  • Anagrams

    * ----