Crap vs Junk - What's the difference?

crap | junk |


As a noun junk is

discarded or waste material; rubbish, trash or junk can be (nautical) a chinese sailing vessel.

As a verb junk is

to throw away.

crap

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) crappe, also in plural: crappen, crappys, . Related to (l).

Noun

(en-noun)
  • (obsolete) The husk of grain; chaff.
  • (slang) Something of poor quality.
  • The long-running game show went from offering good prizes to crap in no time.
  • (slang, vulgar) Something that is rubbish; nonsense.
  • The college student boasted of completing a 10,000-word essay on Shakespeare, but the professor judged it as utter crap .
  • (slang, vulgar) Faeces or feces.
  • (slang, vulgar, countable) An act of defecation.
  • ''I have to take a crap
  • (slang) Useless object or entity.
  • What is that?'' ''It's just a bunch of crap

    Verb

    (crapp)
  • (vulgar, slang) To defecate.
  • Derived terms
    * crap on - (UK) To talk at length in a foolish or boring way. * To crap something out: to damage or destroy something.

    Adjective

    (crapper)
  • (chiefly, UK, colloquial, somewhat, vulgar) Of poor quality.
  • I drove an old crap car for ten years before buying a new one.
    Alternative forms
    * crappy (chiefly, North America)
    Synonyms
    * lousy * shit * shite * bollocks * piss * fuck * Deuce

    Interjection

    (en interjection)
  • (slang) Expression of worry, fear, shock, surprise, disgust, annoyance or dismay.
  • Oh crap! The other driver's going to hit my car!
    Crap! I lost the game.
    What the crap ?!
    Aw, crap , I have to start over again from the beginning of the level.

    Etymology 2

    From "crab's eyes"

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (gambling) A losing throw of 2, 3 or 12 in craps.
  • Derived terms
    * crap out * crapola * crapulation

    Anagrams

    *

    junk

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) (EtymOnLine).

    Noun

    (-)
  • Discarded or waste material; rubbish, trash.
  • * {{quote-magazine, title=No hiding place
  • , date=2013-05-25, volume=407, issue=8837, page=74, magazine=(The Economist) citation , passage=In America alone, people spent $170 billion on “direct marketing”—junk mail of both the physical and electronic varieties—last year. Yet of those who received unsolicited adverts through the post, only 3% bought anything as a result.}}
  • A collection of miscellaneous items of little value.
  • (slang) Any narcotic drug, especially heroin.
  • * 1961 , William S. Burroughs, The Soft Machine , page 7
  • Trace a line of goose pimples up the thin young arm. Slide the needle in and push the bulb watching the junk' hit him all over. Move right in with the shit and suck ' junk through all the hungry young cells.
  • (slang) Genitalia.
  • * 2009 , (Kesha), (Tik Tok)
  • I'm talking about everybody getting crunk, crunk
    Boys tryin' to touch my junk, junk
    Gonna smack him if he getting too drunk, drunk
  • (nautical) Salt beef.
  • Pieces of old cable or cordage, used for making gaskets, mats, swabs, etc., and when picked to pieces, forming oakum for filling the seams of ships.
  • (dated) A fragment of any solid substance; a thick piece; a chunk.
  • (Lowell)
    Synonyms
    * See also
    Derived terms
    * junk bond * junk bottle * junk DNA * junk drawer * junk food * junk hook * junkie * junk mail * junk ring * junkroom * junk science * junkshop * junk vat * junk wad * junkyard

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To throw away.
  • Synonyms
    * (throw away) bin, chuck, chuck away, chuck out, discard, dispose of, ditch, dump, scrap, throw away, throw out, toss, trash * See also

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) junco, from (etyl) djong (Malay (adjong)).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (nautical) A Chinese sailing vessel.
  • References