Carbage vs Junk - What's the difference?

carbage | junk |


As nouns the difference between carbage and junk

is that carbage is shreds and patches of cloth cut off by a tailor when cutting out clothes or carbage can be food that is high in carbohydrates while junk is discarded or waste material; rubbish, trash or junk can be (nautical) a chinese sailing vessel.

As a verb junk is

to throw away.

carbage

English

Etymology 1

Possibly from garbage.

Noun

(-)
  • Shreds and patches of cloth cut off by a tailor when cutting out clothes.
  • References

    * OED

    Etymology 2

    .

    Noun

    (-)
  • Food that is high in carbohydrates.
  • * 2006 , James O'Keefe & Joan O'Keefe, The Forever Young Diet and Lifestyle , Andrews McMeel (2006), ISBN 9780740754883, page 87:
  • The most important reason to avoid “carbage ” like sugar, white flour, and highly processed foods is that they are foreign to our genetic makeup.
  • * 2011 , Tyler Graham & Drew Ramsey, The Happiness Diet: A Nutritional Prescription for a Sharp Brain, Balanced Mood, and Lean, Energized Body , Rodale (2011), ISBN 9781605293271, page 41:
  • This is the same process that browns foods, such as bread crust. The more carbage we eat, the more glycation occurs.
  • * 2012 , Mari Mancusi, Love At 11 , ISBN 9781620510193, page 59:
  • A plain garden salad. That was all she ordered, making me feel like a heifer for having gotten the fried chicken quesadilla. But screw it. After the embarrassment I'd suffered, I needed major carbage .

    junk

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) (EtymOnLine).

    Noun

    (-)
  • Discarded or waste material; rubbish, trash.
  • * {{quote-magazine, title=No hiding place
  • , date=2013-05-25, volume=407, issue=8837, page=74, magazine=(The Economist) citation , passage=In America alone, people spent $170 billion on “direct marketing”—junk mail of both the physical and electronic varieties—last year. Yet of those who received unsolicited adverts through the post, only 3% bought anything as a result.}}
  • A collection of miscellaneous items of little value.
  • (slang) Any narcotic drug, especially heroin.
  • * 1961 , William S. Burroughs, The Soft Machine , page 7
  • Trace a line of goose pimples up the thin young arm. Slide the needle in and push the bulb watching the junk' hit him all over. Move right in with the shit and suck ' junk through all the hungry young cells.
  • (slang) Genitalia.
  • * 2009 , (Kesha), (Tik Tok)
  • I'm talking about everybody getting crunk, crunk
    Boys tryin' to touch my junk, junk
    Gonna smack him if he getting too drunk, drunk
  • (nautical) Salt beef.
  • Pieces of old cable or cordage, used for making gaskets, mats, swabs, etc., and when picked to pieces, forming oakum for filling the seams of ships.
  • (dated) A fragment of any solid substance; a thick piece; a chunk.
  • (Lowell)
    Synonyms
    * See also
    Derived terms
    * junk bond * junk bottle * junk DNA * junk drawer * junk food * junk hook * junkie * junk mail * junk ring * junkroom * junk science * junkshop * junk vat * junk wad * junkyard

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To throw away.
  • Synonyms
    * (throw away) bin, chuck, chuck away, chuck out, discard, dispose of, ditch, dump, scrap, throw away, throw out, toss, trash * See also

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) junco, from (etyl) djong (Malay (adjong)).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (nautical) A Chinese sailing vessel.
  • References