Dumped vs Jumped - What's the difference?

dumped | jumped |


As verbs the difference between dumped and jumped

is that dumped is (dump) while jumped is (jump).

dumped

English

Verb

(head)
  • (dump)

  • dump

    English

    Etymology 1

    Akin to Old Norse )

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A place where waste or garbage is left; a ground or place for ashes, refuse, etc.
  • A toxic waste dump .
  • A car or boat for dumping refuse, etc.
  • That which is , especially in a chaotic way; a mess.
  • (computing) An act of , or its result.
  • The new XML dump is coming soon.
  • A storage place for supplies, especially military.
  • An unpleasant, dirty, disreputable, or unfashionable, boring or depressing looking place.
  • This place looks like a dump .
    Don't feel bad about moving away from this dump .
  • An act of defecation; a defecating.
  • I have to take a dump .
  • A dull, gloomy state of the mind; sadness; melancholy; low spirits; despondency; ill humor (usually plural ).
  • March slowly on in solemn dump . -- .
    Doleful dumps the mind oppress. --
    I was musing in the midst of my dumps . --.
  • Absence of mind; revery.
  • (John Locke)
  • (mining) A pile of ore or rock.
  • (obsolete) A melancholy strain or tune in music; any tune.
  • Tune a deploring dump .
    Play me some merry dump . --
  • (obsolete) An old kind of dance.
  • (Nares)
  • (historical, Australia) A small coin made by punching a hole in a larger coin.
  • * 2002 , Paul Swan, Maths Investigations , page 66,
  • Basically, to overcome an acute shortage of money in 1813, Governor Lachlan Macquarie bought silver dollars from Spain and then punched the centres out, thereby producing two coins - the ‘holey dollar’ (worth five shillings) and the ‘dump'’ (worth one shilling and threepence). Talk about creating money out of nothing—the original silver dollar only cost five shillings! The holey dollar and the ' dump have been adopted as the symbol for the Macquarie Bank in Australia.
    Derived terms
    * braindump * core dump * crashdump * minidump
    See also
    * (obsolete Australian coin) holey dollar

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To release, especially in large quantities and chaotic manner.
  • To discard; to get rid of something one does not want anymore.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-08-03, volume=408, issue=8847, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= Yesterday’s fuel , passage=The dawn of the oil age was fairly recent. Although the stuff was used to waterproof boats in the Middle East 6,000 years ago, extracting it in earnest began only in 1859 after an oil strike in Pennsylvania.
  • (computing) To copy data from a system to another place or system, usually in order to archive it.
  • (informal) To end a relationship with.
  • To knock heavily; to stump.
  • (Halliwell)
  • (US) To put or throw down with more or less of violence; hence, to unload from a cart by tilting it; as, to dump sand, coal, etc.
  • (Bartlett)
  • (US) To precipitate (especially snow) heavily.
  • Synonyms
    * See also
    Derived terms
    * dumping car, dump car * dumping cart, dump cart * dump on * dump and burn

    Etymology 2

    See dumpling.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (UK, archaic) A thick, ill-shapen piece.
  • (UK, archaic) A lead counter used in the game of chuck-farthing.
  • (Smart)
    ----

    jumped

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (jump)

  • jump

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) , from (etyl) {{m, ine-pro, *g??emb-, , to spring, hop, jump}}. Cognate with (etyl) . Related to (l).

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To propel oneself rapidly upward, downward and/or in any horizontal direction such that momentum causes the body to become airborne.
  • The boy jumped over a fence.
    Kangaroos are known for their ability to jump high.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Not the worst of the three but jumps twelve foot and a half by the square.
  • To cause oneself to leave an elevated location and fall downward.
  • She is going to jump from the diving board.
  • To pass by a spring or leap; to overleap.
  • to jump a stream
  • To employ a parachute to leave an aircraft or elevated location.
  • To react to a sudden, often unexpected, stimulus (such as a sharp prick or a loud sound) by jerking the body violently.
  • The sudden sharp sound made me jump .
  • To employ a move in certain board games where one game piece is moved from one legal position to another passing over the position of another piece.
  • The player's knight jumped the opponent's bishop.
  • To move to a position in (a queue/line) that is further forward.
  • I hate it when people jump the queue.
  • To attack suddenly and violently.
  • The hoodlum jumped a woman in the alley.
  • To engage in sexual intercourse.
  • The hoodlum jumped a woman in the alley.
  • To cause to jump.
  • The rider jumped the horse over the fence.
  • To move the distance between two opposing subjects.
  • To increase the height of a tower crane by inserting a section at the base of the tower and jacking up everything above it.
  • (cycling) To increase speed aggressively and without warning.
  • (obsolete) To expose to danger; to risk; to hazard.
  • * Shakespeare
  • to jump a body with a dangerous physic
  • (smithwork) To join by a buttweld.
  • To thicken or enlarge by endwise blows; to upset.
  • (quarrying) To bore with a jumper.
  • (obsolete) To coincide; to agree; to accord; to tally; followed by with .
  • * Shakespeare
  • It jumps with my humour.
    Synonyms
    * (propel oneself upwards) leap, spring * (cause oneself to leave an elevated location and fall) jump down, jump off * (employ a parachute to leave an aircraft or elevated location) skydive * (react to a sudden stimulus by jerking the body violently) flinch, jerk, jump out of one's skin, leap out of one's skin, twitch * (To engage in sexual intercourse) hump, jump someone's bones
    Derived terms
    * jumped-up * jumper * jumpily * jumpy * jump about * jump around * jump at * jump down * jump down someone's throat * jump for joy * jump in * jump in one's skin * jump leads * jump off * jump on * jump out * jump out at * jump up * jump out of one's skin * jump rope * jump seat * jump ship * jump shot * jump-start * jump suit * jump the gun * jump the shark See also'' jumped''', '''jumper''' ''and'' ' jumping

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The act of jumping; a leap; a spring; a bound.
  • * John Locke
  • To advance by jumps .
  • An effort; an attempt; a venture.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Our fortune lies / Upon this jump .
  • (mining) A dislocation in a stratum; a fault.
  • (architecture) An abrupt interruption of level in a piece of brickwork or masonry.
  • An instance of propelling oneself upwards.
  • The boy took a skip and a jump down the lane.
  • An instance of causing oneself to fall from an elevated location.
  • There were a couple of jumps from the bridge.
  • An instance of employing a parachute to leave an aircraft or elevated location.
  • She was terrified before the jump , but was thrilled to be skydiving.
  • An instance of reacting to a sudden stimulus by jerking the body.
  • A jumping move in a board game.
  • the knight's jump in chess
  • A button (of a joypad, joystick or similar device) used to make a video game character jump (propel itself upwards).
  • Press jump to start.
  • (sports, horses) An obstacle that forms part of a showjumping course, and that the horse has to jump over cleanly.
  • Heartless managed the scale the first jump but fell over the second.
  • An early start or an advantage.
  • He got a jump on the day because he had laid out everything the night before.
    Their research department gave them the jump on the competition.
  • (mathematics) A discontinuity in the graph of a function, where the function is continuous in a punctured interval of the discontinuity.
  • (science fiction) An instance of faster-than-light travel, not observable from ordinary space.
  • Synonyms
    * (instance of propelling oneself into the air) leap * (instance of causing oneself to fall from an elevated location) * (instance of employing a parachute to leave an aircraft or elevated location) * (instance of reacting to a sudden stimulus by jerking the body) flinch, jerk, twitch
    Derived terms
    * high jump * * * jump drive * jump jet * jump rope * long jump * triple jump * Walleye jump

    Adverb

    (-)
  • (obsolete) exactly; precisely
  • * Marcellus, in "Hamlet" by William Shakespeare, act 1 scene 1, l 64-65
  • Thus twice before, and jump at this dead hour,
    With martial stalk hath he gone by our watch.

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • (obsolete) Exact; matched; fitting; precise.
  • * Ben Jonson
  • jump names

    Etymology 2

    Compare (etyl) and English jupon.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A kind of loose jacket for men.
  • (in plural) A bodice worn instead of stays by women in the 18th century.
  • 1000 English basic words