Judicial vs Convict - What's the difference?

judicial | convict |


As nouns the difference between judicial and convict

is that judicial is that branch of government which is responsible for maintaining the courts of law and for the administration of justice while convict is (legal) a person convicted of a crime by a judicial body.

As a adjective judicial

is of or relating to a court of law, or to the administration of justice.

As a verb convict is

to find guilty.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

judicial

English

Adjective

(en adjective)
  • Of or relating to a court of law, or to the administration of justice.
  • *{{quote-magazine, date=2013-08-10, volume=408, issue=8848, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= Can China clean up fast enough? , passage=It has jailed environmental activists and is planning to limit the power of judicial oversight by handing a state-approved body a monopoly over bringing environmental lawsuits.}}

    Derived terms

    * judicial astrology * judicial review

    Noun

    (-)
  • That branch of government which is responsible for maintaining the courts of law and for the administration of justice.
  • convict

    English

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To find guilty
  • # as a result of legal proceedings, about of a crime
  • # informally, notably in a moral sense; said about both perpetrator and act.
  • Synonyms

    * (legal crime) sentence * (informal) disapprove

    Noun

    (wikipedia convict) (en noun)
  • (legal) A person convicted of a crime by a judicial body.
  • A person deported to a penal colony.
  • A common name for the sheepshead (Archosargus probatocephalus), owing to its black and stripes.
  • Synonyms

    * (person convicted of crime) assigned servant, con, government man, public servant * (person deported to a penal colony) penal colonist

    Derived terms

    * con (synonym)