Judgment vs Peremptory - What's the difference?

judgment | peremptory |


In context|legal|lang=en terms the difference between judgment and peremptory

is that judgment is (legal) the act of determining, as in courts of law, what is conformable to law and justice; also, the determination, decision, or sentence of a court, or of a judge while peremptory is (legal) precluding debate or expostulation; not admitting of question or appeal; positive; absolute; decisive; conclusive; final.

As a noun judgment

is the act of judging.

As a adjective peremptory is

(legal) precluding debate or expostulation; not admitting of question or appeal; positive; absolute; decisive; conclusive; final.

judgment

English

Alternative forms

* judgement (British) * iugement, iudgement, iudgment, iudgemente, iudgmente (obsolete)

Noun

(en noun)
  • The act of judging.
  • The power or faculty of performing such operations; especially, when unqualified, the faculty of judging or deciding rightly, justly, or wisely; as, a man of judgment; a politician without judgment.
  • * Psalms 72:2 ().
  • He shall judge thy people with righteousness and thy poor with judgment .
  • * Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night's Dream , I-i
  • Hermia. I would my father look'd but with my eyes. Theseus. Rather your eyes must with his judgment look.
  • The conclusion or result of judging; an opinion; a decision.
  • * Shakespeare, Two Gentlemen of Verona , IV-iv
  • She in my judgment was as fair as you.
  • (legal) The act of determining, as in courts of law, what is conformable to law and justice; also, the determination, decision, or sentence of a court, or of a judge.
  • * .
  • In judgments between rich and poor, consider not what the poor man needs, but what is his own.
  • * Shakespeare, Merchant of Venice , IV-i
  • Most heartily I do beseech the court To give the judgment .
  • (theology) The final award; the last sentence.
  • Usage notes

    See for discussion of spelling usage of judgment' versus '''judgement . Briefly, without the ''-e'' is preferred in law globally, and in American English, while with the ''-e is preferred in British English. Like (abridgment), (acknowledgment), and (lodgment), judgment is sometimes written with English spellings in American English, as (judgement) (respectively, (abridgement), (acknowledgement), and (lodgement)). The British spelling preserves the rule that G can only be soft while preceding an E, I, or Y.

    Derived terms

    * against one's better judgment * arrest of judgment * Day of Judgment * judgment call * judgment day * judgment debt * judgment hall * judgment hour * judgment of God * judgment seat * judgment summons * judgment throne

    References

    *

    peremptory

    English

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • (legal) Precluding debate or expostulation; not admitting of question or appeal; positive; absolute; decisive; conclusive; final.
  • * 1596 , Francis Bacon, Maxims of the Law , II:
  • there is no reason but if any of the outlawries be indeed without error, but it should be a peremptory plea to the person in a writ of error, as well as in any other action.
  • Positive in opinion or judgment; absolutely certain, overconfident, unwilling to hear any debate or argument (especially in a pejorative sense); dogmatic.
  • * 2003 , Andrew Marr, The Guardian , 6 Jan 03:
  • He marched under a placard reading "End Bossiness Now" but decided it was a little too peremptory , not quite British, so changed the slogan on subsequent badges, to "End Bossiness Soon."
  • (obsolete) Firmly determined, resolute; obstinate, stubborn.
  • Accepting no refusal or disagreement; imperious, dictatorial.
  • *
  • less surprising than that he had been depressed by a book. Something was making him nibble at the edge of stale ideas as if his sturdy physical egotism no longer nourished his peremptory heart.
  • * 1999 , Anthony Howard, The Guardian , 2 Jan 99:
  • Though today (surveying that yellowing document) I shudder at the peremptory tone of the instructions I gave, Alastair - in that same volume in which I get chastised for my coverage of the Macmillan rally - was generous enough to remark that my memorandum became 'an office classic'.

    Anagrams

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    References

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