Gollied vs Jollied - What's the difference?

gollied | jollied |


As verbs the difference between gollied and jollied

is that gollied is (golly) while jollied is (jolly).

gollied

English

Verb

(head)
  • (golly)

  • golly

    English

    Etymology 1

    Euphemism for God, dating from the 18th century. Possibly a compaction of “God?s body”.

    Alternative forms

    * gollies

    Interjection

  • (euphemistic) God!
  • * 1898 , '', page 511,
  • Golly ! What would dad say if I did marry him?”
  • * 1906 , , Chip of the Flying U , page 88,
  • “By golly , I don?t see how you done that without seein? it happen,” exclaimed Slim, looking very dazed and mystified.
  • * {{quote-book
  • , year=1960 , author= , title=(Jeeves in the Offing) , section=chapter I, VIII, and X , passage=“Got anybody else staying at the old snake pit?” “Five inmates in all.” “Five?” I resumed my tongue-clicking. “Golly'! Uncle Tom must be frothing at the mouth a bit,” I said, for I knew the old buster's distaste for guests in the home. Even a single weekender is sometimes enough to make him drain the bitter cup.
    [...]
    “Bertie! Your manner is strange.” “Your manner would be strange if you'd been sitting on the floor of Wilbert Cream's sleeping apartment with a chair round your neck, and Ma Cream had come in.” “'''Golly'''! Did she?” “In person.”
    [...]
    “And after I had seethed for a bit I rose from my chair, took pen in hand and wrote Bobbie a stinker.” “Oh, gosh!” “I put my whole soul into it.” “Oh, '
    golly
    !”}}
    Synonyms
    * gosh

    Etymology 2

    From golliwog.

    Noun

    (gollies)
  • # A type of black rag doll.
  • #* 1985 , , Volumes 71-72, page 4,
  • There are pictures of the original “gollywogg” (thus spelt) from Florence Upton?s 19th century children?s books; there are examples of anti-semitic Edwardian gollies with huge noses, and all sorts of other curiosities.
  • #* 2007 , , Littlejohn?s Britain , page 162,
  • The Golliwog Squad was also making itself busy in Worthing, Sussex. Police said they were treating as a matter of ‘priority’ a complaint about gollies being displayed in a local store. Owner John Scadgell faced charges under Section 2 of the Public Order Act, which makes it an offence to exhibit anything which could be considered threatening, abusive or insulting.
  • # (offensive, ethnic slur) Any dark skinned person.
  • #* 2005 , Richard Snailham, The Blue Nile Revealed: The Story of the Great Abbai Expedition, 1968 , page 217,
  • “Bloody gollies !” muttered David Bromhead, provoked by the assault into bitter xenophobia.
  • #* 2008 , Theo van Leeuwen, Discourse and Practice: New Tools for Critical Analysis , page 137,
  • poked fun at the American “fashion” of “political correctness” and reassured viewers that gollies and black minstrel shows are just good, old-fashioned, innocent fun.
  • Etymology 3

    Nonstandard diminutive of galosh.

    Noun

    (gollies)
  • (UK) A galosh.
  • Etymology 4

    Possibly from Goliath.
    (en)

    Verb

    (en-verb)
  • (Australia, juvenile) To spit; to force up phlegm from one's throat. golly'”, entry in '''1984 , Eric Partridge, ''A Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English , 8th edition, reprinted 2000, page 483.
  • * 2010 , Marion Houldsworth, The Morning Side of the Hill: Growing Up in Townsville in World War II , revised edition, page 113,
  • When he saw what was happening he threw down his bag, gollied up some phlegm, and spat into the sand.

    Noun

    (gollies)
  • (Australian slang, juvenile) Chewing gum.
  • (Australian slang, juvenile) Saliva or phlegm.
  • hack up a golly
  • * 2011 , Douglas Booth, Surfing: The Ultimate Guide , page 10,
  • They had to have a spitting competition. They had to hack gollies at each other?s heads.(Abraham 1999, 53)

    Derived terms

    * golly pot

    References

    jollied

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (jolly)
  • Anagrams

    *

    jolly

    English

    Adjective

    (er)
  • Full of high and merry spirits; jovial.
  • Noun

    (jollies)
  • (British) a pleasure trip or excursion
  • Adverb

    (en adverb)
  • (British, dated) very, extremely
  • Derived terms

    * jolly well

    Verb

  • To amuse or divert.
  • Derived terms

    * jolly someone along

    References

    * JOLLY in the 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica, vol. 15, p. 495. English degree adverbs ----