Peasant vs Jacquerie - What's the difference?

peasant | jacquerie |


As nouns the difference between peasant and jacquerie

is that peasant is a member of the lowly social class which toils on the land, constituted by small farmers and tenants, sharecroppers, farmhands and other laborers on the land where they form the main labor force in agriculture and horticulture while jacquerie is a violent revolt by peasants.

peasant

Noun

(en noun)
  • A member of the lowly social class which toils on the land, constituted by small farmers and tenants, sharecroppers, farmhands and other laborers on the land where they form the main labor force in agriculture and horticulture.
  • A country person.
  • An uncouth, crude or ill-bred person.
  • (strategy games ) a worker unit
  • Synonyms

    * (lowly social class ) peon, serf * churl * (country person ) rustic, villager * (crude person ) boor

    Derived terms

    * peasantry

    Anagrams

    *

    jacquerie

    English

    Alternative forms

    * Jacquerie

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A violent revolt by peasants.
  • * 1911 , (Saki), ‘The Stampeding of Lady Bastable’, The Chronicles of Clovis :
  • A jacquerie , even if carried out with the most respectful of intentions, cannot fail to leave some traces of embarrassment behind it.
  • * 1951 , publication), part V: “The Merchant Princes”, chapter 18, page 185, ¶ 9:
  • “Is that what you’re setting your hopes on, man? What do you expect? A housewives’ rebellion? A Jacquerie ?[”]
  • * 1986 , G Krishnan-Kutty, Peasantry in India , p. 71:
  • Whenever a jacquerie occurred, the authorities looked "upon it as a revolt of the underdog against his native oppressor."