Inanimate vs Irksome - What's the difference?

inanimate | irksome | Related terms |

Inanimate is a related term of irksome.


As adjectives the difference between inanimate and irksome

is that inanimate is lacking the quality or ability of motion; as an inanimate object while irksome is disagreeable or troublesome by reason of long continuance or repetition; bothersome; annoying; irritating; wearisome; tedious.

As a noun inanimate

is something that is not alive.

As a verb inanimate

is (obsolete) to animate .

inanimate

English

Adjective

(en adjective)
  • Lacking the quality or ability of motion; as an inanimate object .
  • Not being, and never having been alive.
  • * {{quote-book
  • , year=1818 , author=Mary Shelley , title=Frankenstein , chapter=5 citation , passage=I had worked hard for nearly two years, for the sole purpose of infusing life into an inanimate body.}}
  • (grammar) Not animate.
  • Antonyms

    * (grammar) animate

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Something that is not alive.
  • Verb

    (inanimat)
  • (obsolete) To animate.
  • (John Donne)
    ----

    irksome

    English

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • Disagreeable or troublesome by reason of long continuance or repetition; bothersome; annoying; irritating; wearisome; tedious.
  • He has this irksome habit of racing up to red lights, so he has to brake heavily.

    Anagrams

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