Inventeth vs Inverteth - What's the difference?

inventeth | inverteth |


In archaic|lang=en terms the difference between inventeth and inverteth

is that inventeth is (archaic) (invent) while inverteth is (archaic) (invert).

As verbs the difference between inventeth and inverteth

is that inventeth is (archaic) (invent) while inverteth is (archaic) (invert).

inventeth

English

Verb

(head)
  • (archaic) (invent)

  • invent

    English

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To design a new process or mechanism.
  • After weeks of hard work, I invented a new way to alphabetize matchbooks.
  • To create something fictional for a particular purpose.
  • I knew I had to invent an excuse, and quickly.
    We need a name to put in this form, so let's just invent one.
  • (obsolete) To come upon; to find; to find out; to discover.
  • * 1590 , Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene , I.vi:
  • Far off he wonders, what them makes so glad, / If Bacchus merry fruit they did inuent [...].

    Synonyms

    * fangle * discover

    inverteth

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (archaic) (invert)

  • invert

    English

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To turn (something) upside down or inside out; to place in a contrary order or direction.
  • to invert a cup, the order of words, rules of justice, etc.
  • * Shakespeare
  • That doth invert the attest of eyes and ears, / As if these organs had deceptious functions.
  • * Cowper
  • Such reasoning falls like an inverted cone, / Wanting its proper base to stand upon.
  • (music) To move (the root note of a chord) up or down an octave, resulting in a change in pitch.
  • (chemistry) To undergo inversion, as sugar.
  • To divert; to convert to a wrong use.
  • (Knolles)

    Derived terms

    * invert sugar * inverted * invertible

    See also

    * convert

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (archaic) A homosexual man.
  • (architecture) An inverted arch (as in a sewer). *
  • The base of a tunnel on which the road or railway may be laid and used when construction is through unstable ground. It may be flat or form a continuous curve with the tunnel arch. invert (in'?vert) The floor or bottom of the internal cross section of a closed conduit, such as an aqueduct, tunnel, or drain - The term originally referred to the inverted arch used to form the bottom of a masonry?lined sewer or tunnel (Jackson, 1997) Wilson, W.E., Moore, J.E., (2003) Glossary of Hydrology, Berlin: Springer
  • (civil engineering) The lowest point inside a pipe at a certain point.
  • (civil engineering) An elevation of a pipe at a certain point along the pipe.
  • Adjective

    (-)
  • (chemistry) Subjected to the process of inversion; inverted; converted.
  • invert sugar

    References

    English heteronyms