Mint vs Invent - What's the difference?

mint | invent |


As verbs the difference between mint and invent

is that mint is (intransitive|provincial|northern england|scotland) to try, attempt; take aim or mint can be to reproduce (coins), usually en masse, under licence while invent is to design a new process or mechanism.

As a noun mint

is (provincial|northern england|scotland) intent, purpose; an attempt, try; effort, endeavor or mint can be a building or institution where money (originally, only coins) is produced under government licence or mint can be any of several plants of the family lamiaceae, typically aromatic with square stems.

As an adjective mint

is of condition, as new or mint can be of a green colour, like that of the mint plant.

mint

English

(wikibooks mint)

Etymology 1

From (etyl) (m), from (etyl) . More at (l).

Verb

(en verb)
  • (intransitive, provincial, Northern England, Scotland) To try, attempt; take aim.
  • (transitive, provincial, Northern England, Scotland) To try, attempt, endeavor; to take aim at; to try to hit; to purpose.
  • (intransitive, chiefly, Scotland) To hint; suggest; insinuate.
  • Noun

    (en noun)
  • (provincial, Northern England, Scotland) Intent, purpose; an attempt, try; effort, endeavor.
  • Etymology 2

    From (etyl) (m), .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A building or institution where money (originally, only coins) is produced under government licence.
  • (informal) A large amount of money. A vast sum or amount, etc.
  • That house is worth a mint
    It must have cost a mint to produce!
  • (figurative) Any place regarded as a source of unlimited supply; the supply itself.
  • * Shakespeare
  • A mint of phrases in his brain.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To reproduce (coins), usually en masse, under licence.
  • To invent; to forge; to fabricate; to fashion.
  • * Francis Bacon
  • titles of such natures as may be easily minted

    Derived terms

    * mintage * minted * mintmark

    Adjective

    (-)
  • Of condition, as new.
  • in mint condition .
  • (numismatics) In near-perfect condition; uncirculated.
  • (philately) Unused with original gum; as issued originally.
  • (UK, slang) Very good.
  • * 2014 , Holly Hagan, Not Quite a Geordie
  • And my God, what a house it was – it was mint ! In all my life I had never set foot in such a beautiful place.

    See also

    * bullion

    Etymology 3

    From (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Any of several plants of the family Lamiaceae, typically aromatic with square stems.
  • The flavouring of the plant, either a sweet, a jelly or sauce.
  • A green colour, like that of mint.
  • A mint-flavored candy, often eaten to sweeten the smell of the breath.
  • Derived terms
    * apple mint * bergamot mint * brandy mint * breath mint * brook mint * brown mint * catmint * chocolate mint * corn mint * crisped mint, crisp mint * curled mint * fish mint * grapefruit mint * horse mint * mackerel mint * mint cake * mint-drop * mint imperial * mint jelly * mint julep * Minto * mint sauce * mint-sling * mint-stick * mint tea * mint vinegar * mint-water * minty * peppermint * pineapple mint * scotch mint * spearmint * stone mint * water mint * wild mint

    Adjective

    (er)
  • Of a green colour, like that of the mint plant.
  • See also

    * balm * bee balm * bergamot * betony * catnip * clary * dragonhead * henbit * horehound * labiate * * lemon balm * monarda * oregano * patchouli * pennyroyal * perilla * rosemary * salvia * selfheal * skullcap * spike lavender * thyme * wild bergamot * woundwort * ----

    invent

    English

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To design a new process or mechanism.
  • After weeks of hard work, I invented a new way to alphabetize matchbooks.
  • To create something fictional for a particular purpose.
  • I knew I had to invent an excuse, and quickly.
    We need a name to put in this form, so let's just invent one.
  • (obsolete) To come upon; to find; to find out; to discover.
  • * 1590 , Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene , I.vi:
  • Far off he wonders, what them makes so glad, / If Bacchus merry fruit they did inuent [...].

    Synonyms

    * fangle * discover