Insinuate vs Intervene - What's the difference?

insinuate | intervene |


As verbs the difference between insinuate and intervene

is that insinuate is (rare) to creep, wind, or flow into; to enter gently, slowly, or imperceptibly, as into crevices while intervene is (ambitransitive) to come between, or to be between, persons or things.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

insinuate

English

Verb

  • (rare) To creep, wind, or flow into; to enter gently, slowly, or imperceptibly, as into crevices.
  • * Woodward
  • The water easily insinuates itself into, and placidly distends, the vessels of vegetables.
  • (figurative, by extension) To ingratiate; to obtain access to or introduce something by subtle, cunning or artful means.
  • * 1995 , , p. 242
  • Nanny didn't so much enter places as insinuate herself; she had unconsciously taken a natural talent for liking people and developed it into an occult science.
  • * John Locke
  • All the art of rhetoric, besides order and clearness, are for nothing else but to insinuate wrong ideas, move the passions, and thereby mislead the judgment.
  • * Dryden
  • Horace laughs to shame all follies and insinuates virtue, rather by familiar examples than by the severity of precepts.
  • * Clarendon
  • He insinuated himself into the very good grace of the Duke of Buckingham.
  • To hint; to suggest tacitly while avoiding a direct statement.
  • She insinuated that her friends had betrayed her.

    Synonyms

    * (Make a way for or introduce something by subtle, crafty or artful means. ): imply

    Anagrams

    * ----

    intervene

    English

    Verb

  • (ambitransitive) To come between, or to be between, persons or things.
  • The Mediterranean intervenes between Europe and Africa.
  • * De Quincey
  • self-sown woodlands of birch, alder, etc., intervening the different estates
  • To occur, fall, or come between, points of time, or events; as, an instant intervened between the flash and the report; nothing intervened (i.e. between the intention and the execution) to prevent the undertaking.
  • To interpose; as, to intervene to settle a quarrel; get involved, so as to alter or hinder an action
  • (legal) In a suit to which one has not been made a party, to put forward a defense of one's interest in the subject matter.
  • (Abbott)